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  • £54.40

    The Boys are Back in Town - Phil Lynott - Idar Torskangerpoll

    "The Boys Are Back in Town" is a single from Irish hard rock band Thin Lizzy. The song was originally released in 1976 on their album Jailbreak. Both the single and record album are regarded as the bands most successful both commersial and musically.The songwriter Phil Lynott (1949-1986) was vocalist and bassist in the band. He has composed most of the greatest songs of Thin Lizzy.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £59.00

    Durkle Bandrydge Suite - Bruce Fraser

    Durkle Bandrydge is the name of the composers imaginary world, but it could very well be anyones invisible dream world with a different name. In this very versatile suite by Bruce Fraser, 8 characters are featured, each with its own peculiarities, making Durkle Bandrydge such a colourful place. Do these characters differ that much from us? That is for you to find out! In the last part, all characters come together in a special way.Durkle Bandrydge exists at the end of your street. It is invisible to humans, but Durkle Bandrygators can watch us with great interest. The music will introduce you to some of the characters who live in this unusual place. The parts: Somnanbulyss, who is a giant troll guarding the entrance to Durkle Bandryde. At least, he is supposed to, but he tends to sleep most of the time. His music is therefore very slow moving and sleepy. Long Gwysteen is a tall, mysterious, and somehow sophisticated character, who walls around with a shell on his back. His music glides along rather gracefully. Squelfitch is a rather unpleasant and smelly character who lives in a bog, which is why his music sounds rather slimy and a bit like trying to walk through quicksand. Perfydlia is a meddling old woman, who gossips about everybody and squeals with sudden delight at the small exciting bits of tittletattle about others in the village. In the music you can hear her sudden little squeals of delight. Maryann Lovely is a beautiful young lady, graceful, gorgeous, absolutely devine, and her music is obviously just the same. Thistledoo Nicely is a lively character who spends and spends and spends with her credit card, buying the latest fashion and never worries about having to pay the bills. Her music reflects her excitement when shopping and het 'happy go lucky' approach to life. Marsyn Edginton is the Lord of the manor, the richest man in town, the 'big cheese', the man with all the power and, of course, the biggest house. He is very grand and his music like he could be a king. Jimmy McScotsmyn is a red haired scotsman wearing tartan cap. He misses his home country terribly and eats lots of shortbread, oatcakes, scotch eggs, porridge and drinks an enormous amount of Scotch Wisky, which helps him to have fond memories of the kind of music he would like to dance to when he was a younger man. His favourite dance is a Jig and this is the music he remembers. Grand March of the Durkle Bandrydgators. We hope that you have enjoyed meeting these characters from Drukle Bandrydge and would invite you to listen to all the villagers now march along in a grand parade - it is a pity that you can not see them, what is a wonderful sight. If you listen carefully, you will hear the melodies which belong to the characters as they march past. Oh what a grand spectacle!

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £159.95

    Tunes and Toasts for all Times

    This classic collection of 100 airs, fanfares and works for all occasions is skilfully arranged by Roger Barsotti and makes a perfect edition to your library.Includes: A Fine Old English Gentleman; A-Hunting We Will Go; British Grenadiers; Cherry Ripe; Clementine; Come, Lassies and Lads; Drink to Me Only; Dulce Domum; The Drunken Sailor; For He's a Jolly Good Fellow; The Farmer's Boy; Floral Dance; Frothblowers' Anthem; Here's a Health Unto Her Majesty; John Peel; The Keel Row; Love's Old Sweet Song; March of the Fire Brigades; Princess Royal's Red Cross March; Sir Roger de Coverley; See the Conquering Hero Comes; Soldiers of the Queen; There is a Tavern in the Town; Heart of Oak; Hornpipe; Shenandoah; Rule, Britannia; Annie Laurie; Auld Lang Syne; Bonnie Dundee; Blue-bells of Scotland; Scotch Reel; Scots Wha Hae; Will Ye No Come Back Again?; Ye Banks and Braes; Come Back to Erin; Danny Boy (Londonderry Air); Men of Harlech; Carry Me Back to Old Virginny; Dixie; Good-Night (Shine, Shine, Moon); John Brown's Body; When Johnny Comes Marching Home; Yankee Doodle; Alouette; Abide With Me; Eternal Father, Strong to Save; O God, Our Help in Ages Past; The First Nowell; Good King Wenceslas; O Come All Ye Faithful; While Shepherds Watched; Jerusalem; The Supreme Sacrifice; Dead march from Saul; General Salute; Slow March or Troop 'Scipio'; Troop 'May-Blossom'; Declamatory No.1; Occasional Fanfare No.2; Reveille; Retreat; Last Post; Galop from Orpheus in the Underworld; God Save the Queen (in B); God Save the Queen (in F) and many more.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £20.00

    Scarborough Fair

    Scarborough Fair is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.As the versions of the ballad known under the title Scarborough Fair are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the theory that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task.As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc.The earliest notable recording of it was by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, a version which heavily influenced Simon and Garfunkel's later more famous version. Amongst many other recordings, the tune was used by the Stone Roses as the basis of their song "Elizabeth my Dear". To view a sample PDF score click here.

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  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.

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  • £86.00

    O Helga natt - Adolphe Adam - Jerker Johansson

    O Holy Night is a very well-known Christmas carol. The origin of the carol is French beginning with the words: "Minuit! Chretiens, c'est l'heure solennelle". It is about the birth of Jesus and was written in 1843 by a wine merchant and poet by the name of Placide Cappeau (1808??"77). He turned to the composer Adolphe Adam (1803??"56) and asked him to write a suitable melody. The result was brilliant and the carol was premiered in Cappeau's home town Roquemaure in 1847 by the opera singer Emily Laurey. Based on Cappeau's French text, the English version was written in 1855 by an American Unitarian (Calvinist) minister by the name of John Sullivan Dwight (1813??"93).Adolphe Adam was the son of the pianist and composer Louis Adam (1758??"1848), who did not want his son to follow in his foot-steps as a musician. However, Adolphe wanted otherwise, and already at the age of 17 he was accepted to study at the music conservatoire in Paris. He was a student under Francois Adrien Boieldieu and composed several comical operas that became successful. After the July-revolution 1830 Adam moved to London. He worked for a couple of years before returning to Paris, where he founded a new opera house in 1847, the Theatre national. After the revolution in 1848 it had to close and Adam was ruined, why he had to go back to composing. In 1856 he concluded the ballet Le Corsaire, which together with the ballet Giselle are his most performed works today.

  • £64.00

    Creamy and Crispy - Marc Cunningham

    This composition of Marc Cunningham has four parts, and takes place on a sunny day in a picturesque town. 1. Promenade Many people walk through the city. The band passes through the streets. People are strolling along the avenues and amorous couples are sitting on a park bench. 2. Lovey Dovey One of these couples is knee-deep in love. 3. Crispy and Creamy Here the contrasts between a crisp staccato section in two-four time signature and a smooth legato section in three-four time signature are depicted. Is Crispy the boy and Creamy the girl? 4. Farewell In the last particle the couple says goodbye. We still think back to the walk through the city. It sounds a little less happy now. Not everyone is good at saying goodbye, sometimes a tear flows.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £50.00

    South Down Pictures - Philip Sparke

    South Down Pictures was commissioned by Millenium Brass 2000, an organisation comprising three brass bands from the county of Sussex, England.The bands (Patcham Silver, Hangleton and Brighton Silver) had got together to organise many events to mark the new millennium and these culminated in a concert in Hove Town Hall on July 9th 2000 when all three bands combined to give the first performance of South Down Pictures. The composer spent much of his childhood amongst the South Downs, a range of hills in Sussex which runs parallel to the sea.Opening with a strong unison passage, interrupted briefly by faster figures based on the interval of a fifth, South Down Pictures develops with an often-passionate legato melody. Reaching a climax, this is then followed by the main vivo section of the work, whose main theme is based on the earlier 'fifth' figures. A bridge passage leads to a short chorale figure and a rhythmic climax which dissolves into a plaintive cornet solo over staccato chords. This theme is taken up by the whole band and leads back to a recapitulation of the main theme and earlier material. The cornet tune returns triumphantly in the major key before the opening unison passage reappears to provide a stirring coda.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £47.00

    South Down Pictures (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    South Down Pictures was commissioned by Millenium Brass 2000, an organisation comprising three brass bands from the county of Sussex, England.The bands (Patcham Silver, Hangleton and Brighton Silver) had got together to organise many events to mark the new millennium and these culminated in a concert in Hove Town Hall on July 9th 2000 when all three bands combined to give the first performance of South Down Pictures. The composer spent much of his childhood amongst the South Downs, a range of hills in Sussex which runs parallel to the sea.Opening with a strong unison passage, interrupted briefly by faster figures based on the interval of a fifth, South Down Pictures develops with an often-passionate legato melody. Reaching a climax, this is then followed by the main vivo section of the work, whose main theme is based on the earlier 'fifth' figures. A bridge passage leads to a short chorale figure and a rhythmic climax which dissolves into a plaintive cornet solo over staccato chords. This theme is taken up by the whole band and leads back to a recapitulation of the main theme and earlier material. The cornet tune returns triumphantly in the major key before the opening unison passage reappears to provide a stirring coda. 05:30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £13.95

    South Down Pictures (Brass Band - Score only)

    South Down Pictures was commissioned by Millenium Brass 2000, an organisation comprising three brass bands from the county of Sussex, England.The bands (Patcham Silver, Hangleton and Brighton Silver) had got together to organise many events to mark the new millennium and these culminated in a concert in Hove Town Hall on July 9th 2000 when all three bands combined to give the first performance of South Down Pictures. The composer spent much of his childhood amongst the South Downs, a range of hills in Sussex which runs parallel to the sea.Opening with a strong unison passage, interrupted briefly by faster figures based on the interval of a fifth, South Down Pictures develops with an often-passionate legato melody. Reaching a climax, this is then followed by the main vivo section of the work, whose main theme is based on the earlier 'fifth' figures. A bridge passage leads to a short chorale figure and a rhythmic climax which dissolves into a plaintive cornet solo over staccato chords. This theme is taken up by the whole band and leads back to a recapitulation of the main theme and earlier material. The cornet tune returns triumphantly in the major key before the opening unison passage reappears to provide a stirring coda. 05:30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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