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  • £14.95

    Under Two Flags (Brass Band - Score only) - Coles, Bramwell

    The catalyst for this march came during Bramwell Coles' brief service in the Royal Army Medical Corps at the end of World War One. It was intended as a salute to British Salvationists serving in the Armed Forces and includes quotations from several national airs like Rule Britannia, Men of Harlech, Bluebells of Scotland and God save the King (Queen).

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    UNDER TWO FLAGS (Brass Band Set) - Bramwell Coles

    The catalyst for this march came during Bramwell Coles' brief service in the Royal Army Medical Corps at the end of World War One. It was intended as a salute to British Salvationists serving in the Armed Forces and includes quotations from several national airs like Rule Britannia, Men of Harlech, Bluebells of Scotland and God save the King (Queen).

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    When Thunder Calls - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    When Thunder Calls was commissioned by Dr Nicholas Childs and the Black Dyke Band for their performance at the Gala Concert of the Swiss Open Championships in September 2011. When composing this piece, I decided to focus on both the music and the stage presentation. The way the piece has been composed and designed makes it a very effective way of starting a concert or a second half of a concert.At the start of the piece, the percussion enter the stage and take their positions in their usual place behind the band. They begin playing the piece without a conductor. They keep repeating the opening section while the Basses, Horns, Baritones and Euphoniums march onto the stage.This group of musicians take their seats with the Horns, Baritones and Euphoniums sitting where they usually sit in the band but the Basses sit where the solo cornets usually sit, forming an inner semi-circle of lower brass. When seated and when the music gets to the end of bar 4 the piece continues onto section A. All performers keep repeating this next 4-bar phrase until the trombones march onto stage and stand at the front of the stage with the Bass Trombone standing in between the other two trombones.All performers then play from figure B to C with the trombones taking the lead at the front. When the performers get to rehearsal figure C they repeat this section (the same as section A) while the trombones move from the front of the stage and take their positions where the Basses would normally sit (between the horns and the percussion) and remain standing. Meanwhile, the flugel enters the stage and stands at the front of the stage (standing where the trombones did). When in position the flugel soloist picks up into rehearsal figure D.When the flugel soloist finishes playing, just before rehearsal figure F they then move to their normal seat in the band. At figure F the cornets march onto the stage from either side, they turn and stand side by side each other facing outward towards the audience forming two ‘fanfare’ lines either side of the lower brass. The conductor follows the cornets on stage and on cue they lift their instruments at the same time and perform when the piece gets to figure G.There is no more moving around from this point on other than the solo cornet to move forward with the solo euphonium and perform their duet at letter H. Also the horns are required to stand and play at letter I and then sit just before J.When performed with all the choreography, this piece makes for an exciting addition to any concert repertoire both for the performer and the audience.Suitable for 3rd Section Bands and Above

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Platform to the Heavens - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The piece takes its inspiration from the mountain ranges from one of my favourite countries, Switzerland.I have visited the Swiss Alps on many occasions and I am still taken back by its sheer awesome beauty with every visit. This commission gave me the opportunity to pay homage to this wonderful landscape and paint my own musical picture of it.The piece opens with what I imagine daybreak would be like at one of its many peaks. With the sun growing behind the mountain range, the piece builds from a single note to a huge climatic chord revealing Mother Nature’s creation.Then at rehearsal figure ‘C’ the tempo changes dramatically as we fly through the many slopes of the mountains as if on a manic skiing expedition, revealing the many dangers within the Swiss Alps.The twists, turns and climaxes begin to die away as we enter rehearsal figure ‘M’ - nightfall over the mountains. As the sun disappears, the sky darkens to reveal the beautiful starlit sky above the mountain range. This middle section starts with the various cadenzas that serve as echoes around the Alps. It then leads to a lyrical solo at rehearsal figure ‘O’ as the moonlight illuminates the icy mountain peaks. A final cadenza to conclude this section highlights the end of nightfall as the sun starts to rise again.This recapitulation from the opening, signals a new dawn as the sun rises above the snowy peaks once again. The music at this point in its slightly altered state highlights the dawn of a new day in the Alps. The fast manic ski ride follows which takes the piece to its grand finale conclusion.The idea behind the title of this piece is that the Swiss Alps are so beautiful and vast; I can only imagine that they could be a platform connecting the earth to the heavens above.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    Bestowal of a Century - Christopher Bond

    Tenor Horn Solo with Brass BandBestowal of a Century (2014) was commissioned by Lowenna Taylor, and funded through her Harry Mortimer Trust award which she was presented with at the 2013 British Open Championship following the completion of her studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music in Cardiff. The 15-minute work received its world premiere at the Cornwall Youth Brass Band Christmas concert in 2014 with solosit, Lowenna, working alongside the band under the baton of Les Neish.The Bestowal refers to the presentation of the Royal Trophy by the then Prince of Wales to the famous West of England Bandsman’s Festival in Bugle in 1913. Over the years it has been won by some of the greatest names in brass banding, including Black Dyke and Munn & Feltons - although more recently it has become a wonderful open festival that includes sections for local bands as well as visitors from all over the banding globe. 2014 marked the one-hundredth anniversary of the presentation of the trophy, which is the only brass band trophy to have the official seal of royal patronage.The work, in three distinct sections, opens in a mysterious way, building progressively with interjections from the horn. The composer notes its as though one can imagine different part of the trophy being put together, piece by piece, until the trophy is complete and a climax is reached. Following this, a playful theme is presented which is developed throughout the first section and interacting between soloist and band.The second movement, in complete contrast, is a lyrical melody; heart-wrenching throughout, and sits well both as part of the concerto and also as a stand-alone solo item. The third movement is light-hearted and virtuosic, demonstrating the technical capabilities of the instrument with fast and virtuosic playing, and a cadenza towards the end of the work.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score and Parts - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score Only - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £112.00

    March Slav - Tchaikovsky

    March Slav was composed in 1876 for a charity concert to support the war in the Balkans. It was completed in the remarkably short time of 5 days and was encored twice at its first performance! The themes are based loosely on Serbian folk songs and there is also a reference to the Russian national anthem. The mood is funereal in style at the opening but this gives way to a very triumphant style by the end.This arrangement was prepared for the 2007 Summer concerts of Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Dr Keith M Wilkinson (www.bbwesternreserve.org). It has been recorded by BBWR on the CD Slides Rule!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days