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  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    It Takes Two from Euphonium Concerto - Karl Jenkins

    It Takes Two is taken from Karl Jenkins' Euphonium Concerto, an extended work given its world premiere by euphonium soloist David Childs and the BBC Concert Orchestra conducted by Owain Arwel Hughes in St. David's Hall, Cardiff during the last night of the 2009 Welsh Proms.It Takes Two, which would normally form the third movement of the concerto, is an improvisatory style for the soloist. The music is in the form of a habanera style tango with the euphonium 'partnering' a number of instruments in the ensemble while 'breaking away' from time to time in rolling roulades. A judicious use of multi-phonics rounds off the coda.On his eagerness to compose the work for David, Karl Jenkins stated, "It's been a privilege to write for such a virtuoso performer. We had been talking about it for some time and happily it all came together in 2009. David is a wonderful musician of the highest quality and it was a joy and, indeed, a challenge, to write a work for both him and an instrument of such beauty and agility."It Takes Two for euphonium and brass band recieved its premiere on November 29th 2009 in Swansea's Brangwyn Hall performed by David Childs and the Cory Band conducted by Dr. Robert Childs, and can be heard on Doyen CD262 Moto Perpetuo.Other individual movements and the complete Concerto for Euphonium with brass band accompniament are available from Prima Vista Musikk. Orchestral and wind band versions are available from Boosey and Hawkes.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    March Of The Hours (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Soderstrom, Emil

    March of the Hours was first performed at Star Lake Music Camp in 1962 with the composer supplying an informative listening guide which was printed in the published score; "The phrases are of 12 crotchets each (three bars) signifying the 12 hours. Up to the trio, the music describes the headlong search for pleasure by the thoughtless. Abruptly, the trio brings 'I need thee every hour', but an episode employing the original theme pushes it aside until it reappears, this time against a background of chimes of the full hour (Westminster chimes). While the hour strikes 12, a paraphrase of the opening strains of 'When the trumpet of the Lord shall sound and time shall be no more' is heard. Here the music stops, to be followed by the trumpet sounding (cornets and trombones) and the rest of the band responds with 'When the roll is called up yonder' with a final 'I'll be there'."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.00

    David of the White Rock (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    This is an ancient Welsh air that was first published in Relics of the Welsh Bards in 1794. Dafydd (David) Owain was a famous Welsh bard who lived on a farm called Gareg Wen (The White Rock) in Eifionydd, Carnarnvonshire, North Wales. Tradition has it that on his deathbed he called for his harp and composed this lovely melody, requesting that it be played at his funeral. Accordingly, it was later played at the parish church of Ynys-Cynhaiarn. Lyrics were later added by Ceiriog Hughes, which describe the melody's inspiration. This version for brass band retains all the beauty and simplicity of the original. 02:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £100.00

    King Arthur (Scenes from a Radio Drama) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Britten, Benjamin - Hindmarsh, Paul

    King Arthur (Scenes from a radio drama) was the first of 28 scores Benjamin Britten (1913–1976) composed for radio between 1937 and 1947. It was an ambitious dramatisation of King Arthur’s life and times – part pageant, part play, part cantata – written by D.G. Bridson.This colourful suite incorporates the Introduction, a dramatic Wild Dance, some of the music underscoring the scenes for Galahad and The Holy Grail, and two vivid battle scenes, ending with The Final Battle and Apotheosis.King Arthur (Scenes from a radio drama) for brass band should not be confused with a much longer orchestral suite which Paul Hindmarsh devised from the same source in 1995.Suitable for Premier Youth/2nd Section Bands and aboveDuration: 14.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £19.50

    A Hundred Pipers - Trad. - Alan Beaumont

    A wonderful arrangement of this traditional tune. Complete with an option to include some choreography in the form of a dance routine. Although not much is known about this Scottish folksong (also called "Wi' A Hundred Pipers"), this is certainly a lively piece and is to be enjoyed as much by the band playing it as the audience listening to it.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £19.50

    Ye Morning Stars of Light - Andi Cook

    This composition takes the well-known hymn tune Diadem and turns it into an epic concert work that all bandsmen will enjoy getting their teeth stuck into. Big organ like chords fill the opening stanza’s before the work sets off full of life with fragments of the familiar tune hinted at throughout. There is a great energy to this piece and makes a great way to begin or finish a concert. Certainly one not to be missed.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £25.00

    GREAT GATE OF KIEV, The (from Pictures at an Exhibition) (Brass Band) - Mussorgsky, Modest - Littlemore, Phillip

    Modest Mussorgsky was a close friend of the young artist and architect Victor Hartmann, and his death in 1873 plunged Mossorgsky into a deep depression. The following year a memorial exhibition in St. Petersburg displayed Hartmann's paintings, costumes, architectural designs and sketches. Mussorgsky's visit to it, combined with his desire to write a piece in his friend's memory, inspired him to compose hisPictures At An Exhibitionfor piano. A suite of ten movements, with a recurring Promenade theme, it is one of the composer's most famous works and regarded as a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It is perhaps the orchestral transcription made by Maurice Ravel in 1922 that is now the most famous version of it. This arrangement opens with a brief excerpt fromThe Hut on Fowl's Legs, which was based on a painting of an elaborately carved clock depicting Baba Yaga, a horrible tiny witch that feasts on human bones. The tenth, and final picture in Mussorgsky's masterpiece is commonly referred to asThe Great Gate of Kiev, although it's literal translation is The Bogatyr Gates ??" a Bogatyr being a hero figure in medieval East Slavic legend. It features a grand main theme that is interspersed with a more solemn hymn-like secondary theme. The work closes with a grand final rendition of the Promenade theme that almost grinds to a halt at what must be the foot of what were to be magnificent ceremonial gates (although they were never actually built!). Duration: 6:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £94.00

    Fantasy for Brassband and Organ - Jan Bosveld

    When I was approached to compose a work for brassband and church organ I already envisioned the concept I would use. It would indeed literally become a work for brassband and organ. Without the traditional solos, the organ would form an addition to the brassband orchestration as would the brassband provide an extra register for the organ. In short a homogeneous entity. The most important reason for doing this is quite simple. Since this work can only be performed in a church and because of the specific acoustics of the church, the brassband would sound in al its tone colour like an organ. By using certain registers of the organ and combining these with the brassband a wonderful sound palette can be created. The use of complementary or contrasting tone quality is also possible. The primary theme of this composition is based on these three methods of "colouring". As far as structure is concerned this work consists of two parts. slow - fast. It is built on a number of motifs in which some behave like a consecutive canon. In the fast movement the primary motif develops into a fugue-like section. The canon and fugato are techniques frequently used in classical and contemporary organ literature. The liberal use of structure and motif has lead to the title. "Fantasy for Brassband and Organ".

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £10.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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