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  • £69.95

    Tuba Concerto - Score and Parts - Edward Gregson

    This work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in three versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978) and wind band (1984).The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in four versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978), wind band (1984) and piano reduction.The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    Brass Band Score onlyThis work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in three versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978) and wind band (1984).The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.00

    Water Music (Suite) - Handel, G

    No. 1 - MinuetNo. 2 - AirNo. 3 - Bourr?eNo. 4 - AriaNo. 5 - Allegro Deciso

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £135.00

    Concerto - BELLINI, Vincenzo (Arr.: David Andrews)

    1. Maestoso e Deciso 2. Allegro Polonese

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £64.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score and Parts - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score Only - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days