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  • £39.00

    Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence

    Let all mortal flesh keep silence and stand with fear and trembling, and lift itself above all earthly thought. For the King of kings and Lord of lords, Christ our God, cometh forth to be our oblation, and to be given for Food to the faithful. Before Him come the choirs of angels with every principality and power; the Cherubim with many eyes, and wing?d Seraphim, who veil their faces as they shout exultingly the hymn: Alleluia!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £75.00

    As Above, So Below - Jay Capperauld

    An original composition for brass band and brass quintet by Jay Capperauld was commissioned by John Wallace and The Wallace Collection with the support of the PRS Foundation’s Beyond Borders. This major work enjoyed its world premiere at The Cumnock Tryst on 30 September 2017 at Cumnock Old Church, performed by The Wallace Collection and Dalmellington Band, conducted by Martyn Brabbins.If you would like to perform this work, please don’t hesitate considering The Wallace Collection to provide the brass quintet elements – if you would like to discuss potential performances, please contact us on [email protected] NotesBased on the Hermetic maxim "As Above, So Below", the phrase comes from the cryptic text of The Emerald Tablet, which was purportedly written by a mysterious character who is thought of as an amalgamation of Greek and Egyptian Gods, Hermes Trismegistus. The text first appears in Arabic between the 6th and 8th Centuries and is intended to outline the primitive and hidden sources that constitute the basis of all matter in the universe. The phrase "As Above, So Below" implies an essential "oneness" of all matter and a correlation between the physical elements and supernatural entities that make up our surroundings. The philosophies expressed within The Emerald Tablet have become a founding principle of Alchemy, Occultism, Witchcraft, Theosophy and various other ancient gnostic systems of belief, and this work attempts to explore these forms of so-called "secret knowledge" in a ritualistic trance-like Adagio steeped in the esoteric.The Brass Band is placed at the centre of the stage while the solo Brass Quintet are spread antiphonally around the concert hall and are placed above both the Brass Band and the audience in an attempt to create a direct dialogue between the Above and the Below. Therefore, the piece endeavours to explore the meaning behind the text of The Emerald Tablet as well as the phrase 'As Above, So Below' in a music context while giving particular attention to the ‘SOLVE’ (Latin for 'Separate' which correlates to the Above) and ‘COAGLUA’ (Latin for 'Join Together' which relates to the Below) that is depicted in the image of the Baphomet by the French occultist author, Eliphas Levi, which is a visual representation of the phrase ‘As Above, So Below’.Additional Note of InterestIt was not until the work was complete that the role of the main melody became clear when an unexpected and inadvertent correlation between this melody and that of the Latin Dies Irae presented itself. The plainchant nature of As Above, So Below's melody became a defining feature of the piece and when compared to the melody of the Dies Irae (a similar melody reminiscent of that contained within As Above, So Below), some interesting and unsettling implications unveiled themselves.The findings of a comparison can be interpreted as follows:Both melodies adhere naturally to the plainchant idiom, which in itself strongly relates to a supernatural (or quasi-religious) element in both cases.Both melodies originate in the key of D; the Dies Irae resides in the Dorian Mode on D while the As Above, So Below melody inhabits the D Octatonic Scale.Both melodies can be divided into three distinct phrases, although the melody to As Above, So Below can be divided into three phrases in a number of ambiguous ways.The most striking and unnerving connection is that, by pure chance, the Latin text to the Dies Irae fits perfectly under both melodies giving an entirely specific context to how the melodies are perceived.By understanding the As Above, So Below melody as an alternative to that of the Dies Irae and by interpreting it in the same context, the connotations of the Dies Irae's otherworldliness, and the suggestion of a dialogue with the supernatural and death adds a richer dimension to the As Above, So Below melody which in turn solidifies the esoteric concept of this work.In conclusion, this unanticipated and purely accidental relationship between both melodies is worthy of note more so from an emotional and contextual perspective rather than from any analytical evaluation concerning the music itself - it is the circumstance of the so-called "secret knowledge" that has presented itself within the inner workings of As Above, So Below.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £25.00

    As Above, So Below ??" Score Only - Jay Capperauld

    (This listing is for the purchase of a Score ONLY. To order a complete set of score and parts please click here.)An original composition for brass band and brass quintet by Jay Capperauld was commissioned by John Wallace and The Wallace Collection with the support of the PRS Foundation’s Beyond Borders. This major work enjoyed its world premiere at The Cumnock Tryst on 30 September 2017 at Cumnock Old Church, performed by The Wallace Collection and Dalmellington Band, conducted by Martyn Brabbins.If you would like to perform this work, please don’t hesitate considering The Wallace Collection to provide the brass quintet elements – if you would like to discuss potential performances, please contact us on [email protected] NotesBased on the Hermetic maxim "As Above, So Below", the phrase comes from the cryptic text of The Emerald Tablet, which was purportedly written by a mysterious character who is thought of as an amalgamation of Greek and Egyptian Gods, Hermes Trismegistus. The text first appears in Arabic between the 6th and 8th Centuries and is intended to outline the primitive and hidden sources that constitute the basis of all matter in the universe. The phrase "As Above, So Below" implies an essential "oneness" of all matter and a correlation between the physical elements and supernatural entities that make up our surroundings. The philosophies expressed within The Emerald Tablet have become a founding principle of Alchemy, Occultism, Witchcraft, Theosophy and various other ancient gnostic systems of belief, and this work attempts to explore these forms of so-called "secret knowledge" in a ritualistic trance-like Adagio steeped in the esoteric.The Brass Band is placed at the centre of the stage while the solo Brass Quintet are spread antiphonally around the concert hall and are placed above both the Brass Band and the audience in an attempt to create a direct dialogue between the Above and the Below. Therefore, the piece endeavours to explore the meaning behind the text of The Emerald Tablet as well as the phrase 'As Above, So Below' in a music context while giving particular attention to the ‘SOLVE’ (Latin for 'Separate' which correlates to the Above) and ‘COAGLUA’ (Latin for 'Join Together' which relates to the Below) that is depicted in the image of the Baphomet by the French occultist author, Eliphas Levi, which is a visual representation of the phrase ‘As Above, So Below’.Additional Note of InterestIt was not until the work was complete that the role of the main melody became clear when an unexpected and inadvertent correlation between this melody and that of the Latin Dies Irae presented itself. The plainchant nature of As Above, So Below's melody became a defining feature of the piece and when compared to the melody of the Dies Irae (a similar melody reminiscent of that contained within As Above, So Below), some interesting and unsettling implications unveiled themselves.The findings of a comparison can be interpreted as follows:Both melodies adhere naturally to the plainchant idiom, which in itself strongly relates to a supernatural (or quasi-religious) element in both cases.Both melodies originate in the key of D; the Dies Irae resides in the Dorian Mode on D while the As Above, So Below melody inhabits the D Octatonic Scale.Both melodies can be divided into three distinct phrases, although the melody to As Above, So Below can be divided into three phrases in a number of ambiguous ways.The most striking and unnerving connection is that, by pure chance, the Latin text to the Dies Irae fits perfectly under both melodies giving an entirely specific context to how the melodies are perceived.By understanding the As Above, So Below melody as an alternative to that of the Dies Irae and by interpreting it in the same context, the connotations of the Dies Irae's otherworldliness, and the suggestion of a dialogue with the supernatural and death adds a richer dimension to the As Above, So Below melody which in turn solidifies the esoteric concept of this work.In conclusion, this unanticipated and purely accidental relationship between both melodies is worthy of note more so from an emotional and contextual perspective rather than from any analytical evaluation concerning the music itself - it is the circumstance of the so-called "secret knowledge" that has presented itself within the inner workings of As Above, So Below.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £189.95

    'The New Christmas Collection' - Full Set March Card Size

    The new Christmas Collection carol books contain all the traditional Christmas Carols, with some new 'pop' music arrangements included to add more variety to your carolling this year.

     

    * Note, these are not compatible with the New Christmas Praise books.

    Full list of works in The Christmas Collection:-

    • A child this day is born
    • A Christmas lullaby
    • A great and mighty wonder
    • All I want for Christmas is you
    • All my heart this night rejoices
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Come and worship)
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Iris)
    • Angels we have heard on high
    • A starry night
    • As with gladness men of old
    • Auld lang syne
    • A virgin most pure
    • Away in a manger (The manger scene)
    • Away in a manger (Traditional)
    • A winter’s tale
    • Bethlehem
    • Brightest and best (Spean)
    • Brightest and best (Traditional)
    • Calypso Carol
    • Carol for the Nativity
    • Carol of the bells
    • Carol of the drum
    • Child of Mary
    • Christians Awake!
    • Christ is born (Il est né)
    • Christ was born on Christmas Day
    • Come and join the celebration
    • Come, children, come quickly
    • Coventry Carol
    • Deck the hall
    • Ding dong! merrily on high
    • Do you hear what I hear?
    • Frosty the snowman
    • Gabriel’s Message
    • Gaudete
    • Glory in the highest
    • Glory in the highest Heaven
    • God of God, the uncreated
    • God rest you merry, gentlemen
    • Good Christian men, rejoice
    • Good King Wenceslas
    • Go, tell it on the mountain!
    • Happy Christmas (War is over)
    • Hark the glad sound!
    • Hark! the herald angels sing
    • Have yourself a merry little Christmas
    • Here we come a-wassailing
    • How far is it to Bethlehem?
    • Huron Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • In the bleak midwinter (Cranham)
    • In the bleak midwinter (Darke)
    • I saw mommy kissing Santa Claus
    • I saw three ships come sailing in
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Traditional)
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Willis)
    • It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas
    • It’s the most wonderful time of the year
    • I wish it could be Christmas everyday
    • I wonder as I wander
    • Jesus, good above all other
    • Jingle Bells
    • Jingle bell rock
    • Joy to the world!
    • Last Christmas
    • Let it snow!
    • Little baby Jesus
    • Little children, wake and listen
    • Little Donkey
    • Little Jesus, sweetly sleep
    • Lo! he comes with clouds descending
    • Long, long ago
    • Love came down at Christmas
    • Mary’s boy child
    • Mary’s Child
    • Masters in this hall
    • Merry Christmas everyone
    • Mistletoe and wine
    • Noel
    • O Christmas tree
    • O come, all ye faithful
    • O come, Immanuel
    • O Heaven-sent King
    • O holy night!
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Christmas Carol)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Forest Green)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (St Louis)
    • Once in royal David’s city
    • Past three o’clock
    • Patapan
    • Personent Hodie
    • Praise ye the Lord
    • Ring the bells
    • Rise up, shepherd!
    • Rockin’ around the Christmas tree
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • Sans day carol
    • Santa Claus is comin’ to town
    • Saviour’s Day
    • See, amid the winter’s snow
    • Silent Night!
    • Sleigh Ride
    • Softly the night is sleeping
    • So here it is, merry Christmas
    • Stars are shining
    • Still, still, still
    • Stop the cavalry
    • Sussex Carol
    • Sweet chiming bells
    • Sweet chiming Christmas bells
    • The candle song
    • The cherry tree carol
    • The Christmas song
    • The first Nowell
    • The holly and the ivy
    • The infant King
    • The light has come
    • The shepherds’ farewell
    • The stable door
    • The star in the east
    • The twelve days of Christmas
    • The virgin Mary had a baby boy
    • They all were looking for a king
    • Thou didst leave thy throne
    • Three kings’ march
    • Unto us a boy is born
    • Walking in the air
    • We gather round the manger-bed
    • We three kings of Orient are
    • We wish you a merry Christmas
    • What child is this?
    • When a child is born
    • When Santa got stuck up the chimney
    • Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing?
    • When wise men came seeking
    • While shepherds watched (Cranbrook)
    • While shepherds watched (Handel)
    • While shepherds watched (Winchester Old)
    • White Christmas
    • Who is he?
    • Winter Wonderland
    • Worldwide Christmas message
    • Zither Carol
    • A starry night
    • Christmas Joy
    • Christmas Praise
    • Coventry Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • Mid-winter
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • The everlasting light
    • To celebrate his birth
    • Yuletide Rag

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    CHRIST-HYMN (Brass Band Set) - Robert Redhead

    Christ-Hymn is an expression of response to the ancient Christian hymn quoted by Paul in his letter to the Philippian church (Philippians 2:5-11). After an opening which creates a tone of sadness and quiet suffering, the following music is a joyous expression of the truth that 'He is exalted', 'His name is above all names' and 'Every tongue will confess that Jesus Christ is Lord'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £37.50

    Molly on the Shore - Grainger, P.

    'Molly' is a mix of several traditional Irish tunes "dished up"... one of Percy Grainger's phrases for arranging... with his usual genius. The music leaps and dances with hyperactive energy, but above all sheer fun is what is on the menu. This piece is a delight.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £30.00

    Russian Rag - George L Cobb, Sandy Coffin

    Interpolating the world famous"Prelude" by RachmaninoffCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of Russian Rag has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe. Note the cheeky virtuosity and rubato!Look and Listen (courtesy of Tullis Russell Mills Band):Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £30.00

    That Moaning Trombone - Carl D Bethel, Sandy Coffin

    Comic March One-StepCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of That Moaning Trombone has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe.Note the the reckless abandon with which glissando, at that time a novel effect, is used!Look and Listen (courtesy of the Tullis Russell Mills Band):Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £30.00

    The St Louis Blues - Sandy Coffin, W C Handy

    Two-Step MarchCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of The St Louis Blues has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe.Note the flutter-tonguing and use of muting, the counter-melody in soprano cornet, and the wilder and yet wilder nature of each repetition of the Chorus.Look and Listen:Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £21.50

    Wedding Music (Selections For A Wedding) - Various - Gavin Somerset

    With more and more brass bands performing at weddings, having the correct music is essential for the couple's perfect day. With most of the traditional wedding music coming from large overtures & operas etc, this unique pack of music has been specially designed to minimise fuss (all 4 pieces are printed on just one sheet per part) and have just the "famous" bits included. Specially arranged by Gavin Somerset so that the pieces included can be performed from anything ranging from a full brass band to a brass quintet group and with repeats that can be cut or performed to tailor to each event. The pieces are???BRIDAL CHORUS (from Lohengrin) By Richard Wagner"Here comes the bride"??? is the standard march played for the bride's entrance at many formal weddings. The wedding between Elsa and Lohengrin however was almost an immidiate failure!PACHELBEL'S CANON By Johann PachelbelFormally known as the Canon & Gigue in D and originally composed for a string quartet, the Canon part of the composition has become a favorite at weddings, either as an alternative to the Bridal Chorus (above) or used during the signing of the register. The convention in the Baroque era would have been to play a piece of this type in the moderate to fast tempo, however at weddings it has become fashionable to play the work at a slow tempo.WEDDING MARCH (from "A Midsummer Night's Dream") By Felix MendelsshonPopularized by Princess Victoria's wedding to Prince Frederick William of Prussia and coupled with the Bridal Chorus for the entry of the bride, this Wedding March is often for the recessional at the end. Prelude to "Te Deum" By Charpentier Another item now popular in its use during weddings for its bright fanfares. Many composers have written music to the "Te Deum" text (Te Deum being an early Christian hymn of praise, used still regularly in the R.C Church). The prelude by Charpentier is by far one of the most famous

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days