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  • £45.00

    There is a land of pure delight - Menno Haantjes

    Isaac Watts (1674-1748) wrote the lyrics of "There is a land of pure delight" and is known as the "Father of English Hymnody". Watts was for the English hymn as Ambrose was for the medieval Latin hymn and what Martin Luther was for the German chorale. He wrote about 750 songs, and some of them survide the ravahes of time. (Joy To The World, When I survey the wondrous cross, I sing the Mighty Power of God) "There is a Land of Pure Delight" is usually in English-speaking areas sung on Luther Orlando Emerson's melody ('Ascription'). Here is used a traditional English melody ('Mendip'). There is a land of pure delight Where saints immortal Reign. Infinite day excludes the night, And pleasures banish pain.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £37.00

    Circus Delight - Dagmar Kildevann

    'Circus Delight' is a five-part suite which is set, how could it be otherwise, in a big circus tent. The suite starts with a part called 'Entrance'. The orchestra, positioned above the entrance of the ring asks for the attention of the audience and then the ring announcer enters. The show can begin! The elephants play a central role in the first act. These colossal grey animals are rather slow and perform their tricks in a moderate tempo. ('Elephant Blues') How different are 'The Acrobats'. At high speed they run, jump and fly through the ring, until ....... It gets very exciting. Fortunately, all's well that ends well and they take their leave of the audience at a trot. Everyone knows, and yet it is mostly not spoken about, that when a clown has taken off his red nose and rubbed off his make-up, his face off-stage is not always a happy one. ('Tears of the Clown') The piece ends on a cheerful note with 'The Parade', in which all the artists make their entrance in the ring once again to gratefully acknowledge the audience's overwhelming applause.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £59.00

    Durkle Bandrydge Suite - Bruce Fraser

    Durkle Bandrydge is the name of the composers imaginary world, but it could very well be anyones invisible dream world with a different name. In this very versatile suite by Bruce Fraser, 8 characters are featured, each with its own peculiarities, making Durkle Bandrydge such a colourful place. Do these characters differ that much from us? That is for you to find out! In the last part, all characters come together in a special way.Durkle Bandrydge exists at the end of your street. It is invisible to humans, but Durkle Bandrygators can watch us with great interest. The music will introduce you to some of the characters who live in this unusual place. The parts: Somnanbulyss, who is a giant troll guarding the entrance to Durkle Bandryde. At least, he is supposed to, but he tends to sleep most of the time. His music is therefore very slow moving and sleepy. Long Gwysteen is a tall, mysterious, and somehow sophisticated character, who walls around with a shell on his back. His music glides along rather gracefully. Squelfitch is a rather unpleasant and smelly character who lives in a bog, which is why his music sounds rather slimy and a bit like trying to walk through quicksand. Perfydlia is a meddling old woman, who gossips about everybody and squeals with sudden delight at the small exciting bits of tittletattle about others in the village. In the music you can hear her sudden little squeals of delight. Maryann Lovely is a beautiful young lady, graceful, gorgeous, absolutely devine, and her music is obviously just the same. Thistledoo Nicely is a lively character who spends and spends and spends with her credit card, buying the latest fashion and never worries about having to pay the bills. Her music reflects her excitement when shopping and het 'happy go lucky' approach to life. Marsyn Edginton is the Lord of the manor, the richest man in town, the 'big cheese', the man with all the power and, of course, the biggest house. He is very grand and his music like he could be a king. Jimmy McScotsmyn is a red haired scotsman wearing tartan cap. He misses his home country terribly and eats lots of shortbread, oatcakes, scotch eggs, porridge and drinks an enormous amount of Scotch Wisky, which helps him to have fond memories of the kind of music he would like to dance to when he was a younger man. His favourite dance is a Jig and this is the music he remembers. Grand March of the Durkle Bandrydgators. We hope that you have enjoyed meeting these characters from Drukle Bandrydge and would invite you to listen to all the villagers now march along in a grand parade - it is a pity that you can not see them, what is a wonderful sight. If you listen carefully, you will hear the melodies which belong to the characters as they march past. Oh what a grand spectacle!

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £60.00

    Danceries

    In Danceries , by Kenneth Hesketh, the melodies themselves are a mixture of old and new. Where the old occurs it has been adapted in mood and composition and is often interspersed with completely new material. The contemporary harmonies and rhythms bring a breath of new into these themes and add drama to the suite. The first movement, Lull Me Beyond Thee , is gentle and lilting, almost a barcarole, this movement is very much a reverie. The original tune had the name ‘Poor Robin’s Maggot’, a rather disconcerting title; maggot, however, in seventeenth-century parlance meant whim or fancy. The second, Catching of Quails , is a colourful, buoyant scherzo on an original melody. The thematic material is shuttled around the band to contrast with full-blooded tuttis. The last few bars fade to almost nothing, before a final surprise! My Lady’s Rest is a tender pavane, also on an original melody, with Moorish leanings. Beautiful solo passages, expressive contrapuntal writing and warm tuttis provide an opportunity to show off the most lyrical of playing. The final movement, Quodling’s Delight is a clever combination of the 17th century melody, 'Goddesses', with an original contrasting melody, creating a rousing and exuberant finale to the work. A sound clip of the last movement, Quodling's Delight , can be found here Item Code: 0-571-56512-3 Duration: c.15'40"

  • £49.95

    Proverbially - Tom Davoren

    Proverbially is a concertino for euphonium and brass band composed for Glenn Van Looy. The piece is structured in three individual movements, each around 3 minutes. Each movement is based on a particular modern proverb: Between the Lines, inspired by the phrase, reading between the lines; Red Sky, inspired by the proverb, red sky at night, shepherd's delight; A Stitch in Time, inspired by the proverb, a stitch in time saves nine.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Mansions of Glory - Score & Parts - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Mansions of Glory - Score Only - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.99 £34.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Bincombe Beeches | Brian Daniels

    A lovely bright lyrical march with a memorable melody and a welcome alternative to the standard march. Bincombe Beeches has a nice interlude section, a change of time signature from 4/4 to 6/8 before returning to 4/4 for its play out. Try something different ??" for a melody to delight the audience, get their toes tapping, and stays in their heads long after the performance.

  • £25.00

    La Musica Notturna Delle Strade di Madrid

    DescriptionLuigi Boccherini was born in Lucca, Italy, into a musical family. His father, a cellist and double-bass player, sent him to study in Rome at a young age. In 1757 they both went to Vienna, where the court employed them as musicians in the Burgtheater. In 1761 Boccherini went to Madrid, entering the employ of Prince Luis Antonio of Spain, younger brother of King Charles III. There he flourished under royal patronage, until one day when the King expressed his disapproval at a passage in a new trio, and ordered Boccherini to change it. The composer, no doubt irritated with this intrusion into his art, doubled the passage instead, which led to his immediate dismissal. Then he accompanied Don Luis to Arenas de San Pedro, a little town in the Gredos mountains, where Boccherini wrote many of his most famous works. Although neglected after his death and throughout the 19th and early 20th century (he was known mockingly as 'Haydn's Wife' for a time), Boccherini's music has been rediscovered in recent decades.La Musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid('Night Music of the Streets of Madrid') is a string quintet of seven short movements composed during Boccherini's exile in Arenas, no doubt to remind him and his prince of happier times. The music is reminiscent of "the gaiety and bustle of Spain's capital, recalling the sound of the city's church bells ringing for evening prayer, the popular dances that were the delight of its young people, and the blind beggars singing their typical songs". This arrangement excludes the first and last two movements, comprising the middle four:Il Tamburo di Soldati(The Soldier's Drum)Minuetto dei Ciechi(The Minuet of the Blind Beggars)Il Rosario(The Rosary)Passe Calle(The Passacaglia of the Street Singers)The music was featured in the Russell Crowe filmMaster and Commander: The Far Side of the World(2003) set during the Napoleonic Wars and featuring the adventures of the Royal Navy ship HMS Surprise and her captain Jack Aubrey as they pursue the French ship Acheron into the Pacific Ocean.To view a PDF preview of the score click here.Duration approximately 5'00".

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  • £25.00

    Bolsover Castle - Gavin Somerset

    This work was commissioned by the Bolsover International Brass Band Summer School in memory of David Morris, a valued member of both the Summer School and Festival of Brass team. The light-hearted, traditional style March is playable by most levels of bands and following its popularity, has been declared the BIBBSS's signature tune. A donation from each sale of this title is being made to fund the 'Dave Morris Bursary Fund', to aid young people that need financial support to attend the Summer School. Course leader, Steven Mead describes the work as, "A really outstanding composition, based on the traditional March format, but with a freshness and excellent thematic material. It is a brisk march in 6/8 that is a delight to play and to listen to."

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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