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  • £27.00

    Auld Lang Syne (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    It is a tradition in most English-speaking countries to sing this song at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve to usher in the New Year. The words are at least partially written by Robert Burns and the words "Auld Lang Syne" literally mean "old long ago" or "the good old days", providing a moment of reflection before moving forwards into the New Year.The tubular bells, although pitched, sound midnight when they enter at bar 10.This arrangement was prepared for Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Keith M Wilkinson, to perform at First Night, Akron, Ohio, December 31st, 2007. The following choreography is suggested:Commence the performance with all the cornets scattered around the auditorium.At the end of bar 18 invite the audience to sing along with the band.At bar 27 the cornets move to stand in front of the other members of the band to lead to the stirring conclusion. Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne?For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne,We'll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £30.00

    TOCCATA (from Symphony No.8) (Brass Band) - Vaughan Williams, Ralph - Littlemore, Phillip

    Ralph Vaughan Williams' Symphony in D minor (his eighth) was composed in 1956, when he was in his 84th year. It is noticeably different from its predecessors in its diminutive scale and comparatively short length. However, the symphony is scored for an unusually large percussion ensemble including vibraphone, xylophone, tubular bells, glockenspiel, tuned gongs and celeste. In the Toccata, the fourth and final movement, Vaughan Williams uses the enlarged percussion forces extensively - the eight symphony is therefore in some ways a highly imaginative work, perhaps even an experimental one.. This brass band transcription tries to remain as true to the original percussion writing as possible, but with the omission of the tuned gongs and celeste??"for obvious practical performance reasons. Duration: 5:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £39.99 £39.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Christmas Eve | David Stowell

    The scene is set one very cold, very snowy Christmas Eve. In the market square a Brass Band plays a traditional Christmas melody, when in the distance, a second melody can be heard from another village nearby, and the magic of Christmas is created.This magical true life experience was what prompted David to write Christmas Eve, but in this piece, he has also woven in a third melody.Instrumentation: Solo Quartet: Solo Cornet, Repiano Cornet, Solo Tenor horn, Solo Euphonium Main Band: Soprano, Solo, 2nd and 3rd Cornets Flugelhorn 1st and 2nd Tenor Horns 1st and 2nd Baritone 1st, 2nd and Bass Trombone Euphonium Eb and Bb Basses Percussion: Glockenspiel, Tubular BellsISMN: 979-0-708127-39-0

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  • £27.00

    Auld Lang Syne

    It is a tradition in most English-speaking countries to sing this song at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve to usher in the New Year. The words are at least partially written by Robert Burns and the words "Auld Lang Syne" literally mean "old long ago" or "the good old days", providing a moment of reflection before moving forwards into the New Year.The tubular bells, although pitched, sound midnight when they enter at bar 10.This arrangement was prepared for Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Keith M Wilkinson, to perform at First Night, Akron, Ohio, December 31st, 2007. The following choreography is suggested:Commence the performance with all the cornets scattered around the auditorium.At the end of bar 18 invite the audience to sing along with the band.At bar 27 the cornets move to stand in front of the other members of the band to lead to the stirring conclusion. Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne?For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne,We'll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £75.00

    Dances and Arias - Edward Gregson

    This work was commissioned by Boosey & Hawkes Band Festivals (with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain) for the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London, on 7th October 1984.Dances and Arias is in one continuous movement, but as the title suggests is a series of alternating fast and slow sections as follows: Dance – Aria I – Dance (scherzo) – Aria II – Dance. The opening dance is energetic and introduces a four-note motif (on trombones) which is the basis for much of the melodic material in the work. Throughout, there is a continuous process of thematic cross-reference and transformation.The first aria unfolds a long melody on solo cornet, eventually continued by all the solo cornets, and dissolving into a shimmering harmonic background (muted cornets, horns and baritones) over which is heard a brief self-quotation on solo tuba. This leads into the second dance, a frenetic scherzo, followed by the second aria, in the style of a lament (solo euphonium, followed by two flugel horns). This builds to a powerful climax which subsides, leaving the percussion to introduce the final toccata-like dance. It transforms material from the opening before a coda brings the music to a triumphant close. The large percussion section is an integral part in the work and uses a wide variety of instruments including timpani, glockenspiel, vibraphone, xylophone, tubular bells, tom-toms, snare drum, bongos and tam-tam.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £30.00

    Janacek's 'Taras Bulba' - Janacek

    Comments from Tim Paton, the arranger of Janacek’s ‘Taras Bulba’: “I will never forget the day in 1967 when I was introduced to the music of Leos Janacek, a Czech composer born in 1854, who died in 1928. Janacek was little known in Britain until the 1960’s, when the conductor Charles Macherras introduced his unique music. I heard a recording of Macherras conducting the Pro Arte Orchestra in a performance of Janacek’s “Sinfonietta”.It was in 1969 that I first heard Janacek’s Symphonic Rhapsody, “Taras Bulba”.Janacek’s music is exciting, powerful, emotive, impassioned and unpredictable.I have taken the first and third movements of this piece, and adapted them for Brass Band, which was at times extremely difficult, but rewarding. It sometimes took up to an hour to be satisfied that a mere several bars had been reproduced to convey the composer’s intentions.The Death of AndriThe Cossaks, under the leadership of Taras Bulba, are fighting against the Poles in the 17th century. Taras’s son Andri seeks to rescue his love, a Polish princess, from a city which is being besieged by the Cossaks. Having found her, he throws in his lot with the Poles, but is finally captured by his father, who executes him as a traitor before riding off again to battle.Prophesy and Death of Taras BulbaTaras himself is finally captured and condemned to be nailed to a tree and burned alive. As the flames creep around him, Taras has the satisfaction of seeing histroops escape, and as he dies, sees a vision of his country freed at last.This is incredibly descriptive music. The mood is constantly changing, creating feelings of love and anger, celebration and melancholy, despair and triumph.This Brass Band EditionThe duration of the original symphonic rhapsody, three movements, is approximately 23 minutes. I chose the first and third movements, so the Brass Band edition is approximately 14 minutes. The main reason is twofold: Being realistic about the demands this music would place on the stamina of the brass player; Keeping the piece less than 15 minutes, so that, if desired, it could be used on the contest platform.Two unique qualities of Janacek’s music had to be taken into account when preparing this brass band version. His compositional technique was individual, at times not sticking to traditional expectations, in both form and orchestration. I imagined what the genius himself would have said looking at my work, and how to tackle a particular section to emulate his original intentions. This was particularly the case when dealing with high woodwind and violin parts, the use of tremolo in string parts, and the orchestral harp.Percussion: Janacek included timpani, side drum, cymbals, triangle and tubular bells. For reasons stated previously, I have also included xylophone and glockenspiel. I have also added the gong in a couple of places to enhance the dramatic effect of the music.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £49.95

    1812 Overture - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Robert Childs

    The 1812 Overture for Orchestra, Opus 49 is without doubt one of the most popular finales used by orchestras throughout the world. Here we have a new arrangement for brass band skilfully crafted by Dr. Robert Childs. The arrangement is shorter in duration than Tchaikovsky's original, but does not fluctuate from his key structure, making this version the most authentic to date. The arrangement features full orchestral percussion including tubular bells and canon together with optional organ and fanfare brass groups.Dr Childs's arrangement is featured by the Black Dyke Band on their CD Essential Dyke Vol V - Celebrate Rotary (DOYCD193).

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £35.00

    Ascension - Lucy Pankhurst

    A major work written for the RNCM Brass Festival Competition 2005, and inspired by the nature of Ascension – creating a Musical depiction of the spiritual journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As aninitial muse for this work, the ‘Tibetan Singing Bowl’ is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity, together withBaoding Balls(Chinese Health Balls) to mark the point of Final Ascension.Programme notes from the composer, Lucy Pankhurst:Ascension is a Musical depiction of the Spiritual Journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As my initial muse for this work, the Singing Bowl is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity. “Tibetan” Singing Bowls date back to the 8th Century A.D., originating in the pre-Buddhist shamanic Bon Po culture in the Himalayas and are still used in modern Monasteries. The original purpose of them still remains a mystery, with accounts stating that it is forbidden to disclose the true function of the Bowls, as the “secrets of sound” yield so much Power, that they must be kept hidden.Listening to the tones created by the Singing Bowl effectively silences the internal dialogue of the listener, making it an excellent tool for Meditation, Centering and entering trance-like states. In Buddhism, as with many cultures, sound is an important part of Spiritual Practice. There are 9 methods to reach Enlightenment in the Buddhist Doctrine ; the seventh is SOUND.These Bowls are used by Healers in a similar way to help balance the body’s residual energies. The Bowls are usually made from seven different sacred metals, intended to correlate directly to the seven sacred “Planets” : GOLD (Sun), SILVER (Moon), MERCURY (Mercury), COPPER (Venus), IRON (Mars), TIN (Jupiter), ANTIMONY (Saturn). Any one Bowl can create up to seven different frequencies (tones) simultaneously. In Healing, the Singing Bowl is played whilst balanced on the palm of the hand, struck three times to stabilise the surrounding energies, before rotating the wooden “beater” around the outer circumference of the Bowl to create the “singing” effect.I have included an optional Vibraphone part (to be played with a Double Bass Bow) with Tubular Bells, to be used only in performances where a Singing Bowl cannot be acquired. However, a traditional Bowl should be used whenever possible, to create this specific and unique sound.Baoding Balls or Chinese Health Balls are also utilised in this work. Their appearance in the Music here, however, is to mark the point of Final Ascension, where the music reaches its ultimate goal. These delicate cloisonne iron Balls are said to stimulate the acupressure points on the hand, thus improving the Chi and Energy Paths (Life Force) throughout the entire body. The delicate “tinkle” produced by these spheres is hypnotic and captivating. For this reason, where no Baoding Balls are obtainable for performance, only delicate metallic percussion should be used in replacement (i.e. Crotales, Antique Cymbals or (liberal) single strikes on a Triangle etc.). Bell Trees, Wind Chimes and Cow Bells should not be used.As in many cultures, the number three is important in Ascension, as it represents not only the purification from the Singing Bowl, but also it is a number of confirmation, reiterated throughout the music in the metallic percussion in addition to the Brass, re-affirming the correct path to Enlightenment.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days