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  • £49.99

    A Baroque Triptych (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Beringen, Robert van

    In his own distinctive style, Robert van Beringen has composed a very unique fantasy on three themes by the famous Baroque composers Johann Sebastian Bach and George Friedrich Hndel. Van Beringen used Bach's chorale Brich an, o schnes Morgenlicht ('Break forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light') from his Christmas Oratorio and the recitative Behold, a Virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Emmanuel, God with Us from Hndel's Messiah. A perfect way to say Merry Christmas in music!Duration: 5:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £12.50

    A Baroque Triptych - Robert van Beringen

    In his own distinctive style, Robert van Beringen has composed a very unique fantasy on three themes by the famous Baroque composers Johann Sebastian Bach and George Friedrich Handel. Van Beringen used Bach's chorale Brich an, o schones Morgenlicht ('Break forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light') from his Christmas Oratorio and the recitative Behold, a Virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Emmanuel, God with Us from Handel's Messiah. A perfect way to say Merry Christmas in music!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £38.00

    Unholy Sonnets (Score only) - Philip Wilby

    Pieces for voice and brass band are rare, so Unholy Sonnets, with provocative words by Mark Jarman, occupies an unusual place in the repertory. The four movements are: 'Time to admit my altar is a desk', 'Two forces rule the Universe', 'There was a pious man', and 'If God survives us, will His kingdom come?' Also available with piano.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £48.00

    Unholy Sonnets (Parts only) - Philip WIlby

    Pieces for voice and brass band are rare, so Unholy Sonnets, with provocative words by Mark Jarman, occupies an unusual place in the repertory. The four movements are: 'Time to admit my altar is a desk', 'Two forces rule the Universe', 'There was a pious man', and 'If God survives us, will His kingdom come?' Also available with piano.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £11.95

    Unholy Sonnets - Philip WIlby

    Pieces for voice and brass band are rare, so Unholy Sonnets, with provocative words by Mark Jarman, occupies an unusual place in the repertory. The four movements are: 'Time to admit my altar is a desk', 'Two forces rule the Universe', 'There was a pious man', and 'If God survives us, will His kingdom come?'

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £89.95

    INFINITY (Brass Band Set) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £10.00

    INFINITY (Brass Band Study Score) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £189.95

    'The New Christmas Collection' - Full Set March Card Size

    The new Christmas Collection carol books contain all the traditional Christmas Carols, with some new 'pop' music arrangements included to add more variety to your carolling this year.

     

    * Note, these are not compatible with the New Christmas Praise books.

    Full list of works in The Christmas Collection:-

    • A child this day is born
    • A Christmas lullaby
    • A great and mighty wonder
    • All I want for Christmas is you
    • All my heart this night rejoices
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Come and worship)
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Iris)
    • Angels we have heard on high
    • A starry night
    • As with gladness men of old
    • Auld lang syne
    • A virgin most pure
    • Away in a manger (The manger scene)
    • Away in a manger (Traditional)
    • A winter’s tale
    • Bethlehem
    • Brightest and best (Spean)
    • Brightest and best (Traditional)
    • Calypso Carol
    • Carol for the Nativity
    • Carol of the bells
    • Carol of the drum
    • Child of Mary
    • Christians Awake!
    • Christ is born (Il est né)
    • Christ was born on Christmas Day
    • Come and join the celebration
    • Come, children, come quickly
    • Coventry Carol
    • Deck the hall
    • Ding dong! merrily on high
    • Do you hear what I hear?
    • Frosty the snowman
    • Gabriel’s Message
    • Gaudete
    • Glory in the highest
    • Glory in the highest Heaven
    • God of God, the uncreated
    • God rest you merry, gentlemen
    • Good Christian men, rejoice
    • Good King Wenceslas
    • Go, tell it on the mountain!
    • Happy Christmas (War is over)
    • Hark the glad sound!
    • Hark! the herald angels sing
    • Have yourself a merry little Christmas
    • Here we come a-wassailing
    • How far is it to Bethlehem?
    • Huron Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • In the bleak midwinter (Cranham)
    • In the bleak midwinter (Darke)
    • I saw mommy kissing Santa Claus
    • I saw three ships come sailing in
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Traditional)
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Willis)
    • It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas
    • It’s the most wonderful time of the year
    • I wish it could be Christmas everyday
    • I wonder as I wander
    • Jesus, good above all other
    • Jingle Bells
    • Jingle bell rock
    • Joy to the world!
    • Last Christmas
    • Let it snow!
    • Little baby Jesus
    • Little children, wake and listen
    • Little Donkey
    • Little Jesus, sweetly sleep
    • Lo! he comes with clouds descending
    • Long, long ago
    • Love came down at Christmas
    • Mary’s boy child
    • Mary’s Child
    • Masters in this hall
    • Merry Christmas everyone
    • Mistletoe and wine
    • Noel
    • O Christmas tree
    • O come, all ye faithful
    • O come, Immanuel
    • O Heaven-sent King
    • O holy night!
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Christmas Carol)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Forest Green)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (St Louis)
    • Once in royal David’s city
    • Past three o’clock
    • Patapan
    • Personent Hodie
    • Praise ye the Lord
    • Ring the bells
    • Rise up, shepherd!
    • Rockin’ around the Christmas tree
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • Sans day carol
    • Santa Claus is comin’ to town
    • Saviour’s Day
    • See, amid the winter’s snow
    • Silent Night!
    • Sleigh Ride
    • Softly the night is sleeping
    • So here it is, merry Christmas
    • Stars are shining
    • Still, still, still
    • Stop the cavalry
    • Sussex Carol
    • Sweet chiming bells
    • Sweet chiming Christmas bells
    • The candle song
    • The cherry tree carol
    • The Christmas song
    • The first Nowell
    • The holly and the ivy
    • The infant King
    • The light has come
    • The shepherds’ farewell
    • The stable door
    • The star in the east
    • The twelve days of Christmas
    • The virgin Mary had a baby boy
    • They all were looking for a king
    • Thou didst leave thy throne
    • Three kings’ march
    • Unto us a boy is born
    • Walking in the air
    • We gather round the manger-bed
    • We three kings of Orient are
    • We wish you a merry Christmas
    • What child is this?
    • When a child is born
    • When Santa got stuck up the chimney
    • Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing?
    • When wise men came seeking
    • While shepherds watched (Cranbrook)
    • While shepherds watched (Handel)
    • While shepherds watched (Winchester Old)
    • White Christmas
    • Who is he?
    • Winter Wonderland
    • Worldwide Christmas message
    • Zither Carol
    • A starry night
    • Christmas Joy
    • Christmas Praise
    • Coventry Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • Mid-winter
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • The everlasting light
    • To celebrate his birth
    • Yuletide Rag

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    TRAILBLAZERS (Brass Band Set) - Andrew Mackereth

    This overture draws its inspiration from the story of the first Household Troops Band. It tells the story of the 1887 band, the subsequent lull of nearly a hundred years and the re-awakening of the Troops phenomenon in 1985. It was originally written in 1995 and featured prominently by the band on its North American tour of 2002. Given the history of the Household Troops Band, it is fitting that this composition is preoccupied with marching. It begins with a marching song played by a solitary muted cornet, symbolic not only of the call to bandsmen to join the evangelical effort but also a muso-dramatic device to indicate the steady increase in members and technical ability! The music quickly develops into stirring versions of 'A robe of white' and 'Storm the forts of darkness' with two early day Salvation Army tunes crucially adding to the narrative; 'Marching on in the light of God' and 'Soldiers of our God, arise!' The second section is a reflective setting of the Herbert Booth song, 'The penitent's plea'. This song serves to represent the many people who were 'saved' during those early day campaigns. The expressive music transports the listener through a period of uncertainty and angst until finally reaching the song, 'There is a message, a simple message, and it's a message for us all'. The final section deals first with the emergence from the annals of history with the muted cornet figure again before, symbolically, the present day band bursts forth with an emphatic statement of 'Would you be free from your burden of sin? There's power in the blood'. The stirring climax represents a fitting tribute to those gallant pioneering musicians and their equally impressive and dedicated contemporaries.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £55.00

    Purcell Variations - Kenneth Downie

    Purcell Variations, composed in 1995, the year of the tercentenary of the death of the great English composer, was a watershed work in that it was Downie's first extended composition to be published independently of The Salvation Army and intended for wider use. For his theme, Downie has chosen what has come down to us as the hymn tune Westminster Abbey, which is in fact an adaptation made in 1842 by Ernest Hawkins, who was a Canon of Westminster Abbey where Purcell himself had been organist. Purcell’s original is actually the closing section of an anthem, O God, Thou art my God, where it provides the final paean of praise, sung to repeated ‘Hallelujahs’. Purcell’s tune, particularly the opening triadic gesture, is used as a source of thematic and harmonic material – a quarry for ideas if you like: “I was obsessed with the intervals of thirds in Purcell’s tune, rather like Brahms in his Third Symphony”, the composer says.There are five variations, preceded by an extended introduction and theme. In the first variation, Purcell’s lilting dance pulse has been transformed into a bright, playful sequence, in which each phrase of the melody is given its own transformation. In the second, Purcell’s opening gambit is extended into a graceful, flowing waltz, featuring solo and first horn at the top of the register. The composer offers a range of metronome speeds in this movement, in which he is emulating the wistful elegance of Erik Satie’s famous Gymnopedie. We enter the world of big band jazz in variation three, where Purcell’s tune strides along with added syncopation and bluesy major/minor thirds to the fore. After the breathless energy and blazing brass of the big band, Downie moves into his ‘home territory’ for a beautifully worked lyrical variation. There is an enhanced urgency about the final variation, which opens with an extended reprise of the work’s introduction. Purcell’s second and third phrases provide the preparation for the exuberant return, in customary triumph of Purcell’s ‘Hallelujah’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days