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  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Downie, Kenneth

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score only) - Downie, Kenneth

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    TRANSFORMATION (Brass Band Set) - Kenneth Downie

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    Blaze - Phil Lawrence

    Cornet/trumpet sounds have been changing for some years; they are becoming heavier, more robust, slower vibratos. The dynamic level now pushed out by your average solo cornet is 30% more than it was some 35/40 years ago. This, is mainly due to the bore size of instruments and mouthpiece sizes (as in bigger), and, demands of modern day works for band on the player/soloist, and of course a greater demand of styles on the player, and progressive teaching methods. The technical styles in Blaze are about these changes.In Blaze I have clearly blended symphonic blowing styles of the trumpet plus the virtuosic attributes of today's modern cornet player. Many solo cornets parts (more past than present) in band are often clearly defined between low A and top C above the stave. Orchestral trumpet players need a working range of another fourth at either end of this defined range; I have incorporated this range into the concerto. The low register is much explored, and the average tessitura throughout is constantly varied below and above the stave from pedal Eb to super F# opt. The ideology of this blend of course makes sense as the original dedication is to Rod Franks, LSO, and of course blending with that is Rod's history at Black Dyke Mills Band.The concerto is ten minutes long and in one movement comprising of four sections and one solo cadenza, with one section only appearing once, an episode. This singular section was a revised addition and dedicated to Richard Marshall who gave the first premier in New Zealand in June 2003. For the purists the form is thus, A, B, A (vari), C (episode). D (slow movement), E (3/8 episode 1), D (vari), E, (episode 2). A (last move), B, A (developed) = (coda finale).The compositional style? Well, I hope quintessentially, 21st C English with an element of nostalgia (modal/old English). There are some hints at jazz playing styles and rhumba, but romantic English I would say, and especially the slow movement.Blaze is also very bold; the title itself reflects this, full of bravura and constant amazement, offering little respite for the soloist and sapping much stamina. The opening statement from the soloist is without accompaniment; just as a matador stands alone in the ring for the first few seconds, and looks at the mass crowd in defiance, he thinks, "you are here to see me die", so the soloist stares the audience back in the face, and opens with the richest, largest sound (not loudest) one can muster, thus throwing the gauntlet down to the ears of all who might disbelieve what they are about to encounter, a gladiatorial cornet, a Blaze from the stage.For the soloist, it is a non-stop Blaze of sound, electrifying technique, sage-like musicianship, super-human stamina and sheer matador-like bravura with 10th Dan mastery of over-all control, a test beyond the reasonable. And for the audience? Of course, a BLAZE never to be forgotten. Phil LawrenceThis work can be heard performed by cornet soloist Richard Marshall & the Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their award winning album entitled 'BLAZE'

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £63.00

    Animal Kingdom - William Vean

    In this composition William Vean takes you on a journey through the fascinating and exciting world of animals. Apart from it being a composition filled with "special effects", Animal Kingdom contains many educational elements, such as playing in swing (triplets feeling), chromatics, flutter tonguing, gypsy tuning, varying keys, and, of course, dynamics and articulation. The melodic lines occur in all four voices, as well as in all percussion parts, providing each musician with the opportunity to play a solo or to accompany. Highly recommended for your youth band! William Vean is an educational composer. He knows how to musically shape the special elements from our daily lives. His music is therefore very expressive, containing creative solutions to possible problems. Special ways of playing make his music particularly interesting for the winds, but the percussion section is also featured in his special effects. The world of the animals always plays on ones imagination. In Animal Kingdom, William Vean has portrayed a number of animals in a special manner: Kevin Kangaroo - The jumping character of this animal can be heard in different voices. The swing style also emphasizes the characteristic movements of the kangaroo. Playing in swing style can be practised by using scales. Eddy Elephant - For some of his smaller fellow fauna friends this can be quite an ordeal, but for Eduard (Eddy for friends and intimates) it is his daily walk. Baldrick Bat - Baldrick the Bat is a mysterious character. This can be heard in the fast moving valves and keys, accompanied by special effects in the percussion section. Curtis Camel - Curtis the Camel trudges across the desert, feeling bored. The idea that the horizon will never change does not affect him anymore. He has accepted his fate. The distinctive tones from the gypsy scale provide the suitable oriental sounds. Betty Butterfly - Butterfly Betty elegantly, and without worries, flutters from flower to flower in the garden. Her motto: Carpe Diem (Seize the Day). Betty is a one-day butterfly. Marvin Monkey - A "swing" monkey stirs up the feelings. Even members of the orchestra will look like real monkeys. How about your audience? Each part has its own difficulties and challenges. Important in the first part is playing "in swing" (triplets feeling). This can be practised using scales. In the second part ensemble playing and balance are important. In Baldrick additional information on the effects that have to be played might be useful. "New" sounds are, of course, welcome. Curtis the Camel introduces the gypsy scale. Additional explanation of the use of the scale might be useful. Key changes are interesting in this part. A slight accent on the first beat of the bar will add to the charm of this part. Marvin the Monkey brings back the swing rhythm that was introduced in the first part, alternated by a "straight" part with attention to chromatics and articulation. A story teller will definitely be an asset when performing this composition.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £80.60

    Mitt hjerte alltid vanker - Fantasi - Hans Adolph Brorson - Svein H. Giske

    This arrangement was commissioned by B3 (The Bergen Woodwind Ensemble).B3 is a large woodwind ensemble located in Bergen with a mix of professional and amateur players.My Heart Remains in Wonder is a well-known Christmas hymn in Scandinavia. I wanted my version to be different to the traditional hymn tune style in which it is normally performed.One day I was outside walking and this idea came to me: an ostinato-like, mechanical skeleton of arpeggio semiquavers on which I could 'hang' the melody.However, I also wanted to do the melody line a bit different.The inspiration for this comes from folk music and the way fiddlers hardly ever lift their bow off the strings when they play. Because of this, it is important that the melody is played in a very sostenuto style in this arrangement.The harmonies lie somewhere between jazz and folk music with a little nod towards Grieg (himself heavily influenced by folk music) in the slow middle section.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £90.00

    Fragile Oasis - Peter Meechan

    Fragile Oasis is the name of a collective who describe themselves as a??a?a grass-roots participatory initiative that connects the shared perspective of astronauts from different countries and cultures with people on Earth, encouraging all to work together so that our planet is not only visibly beautiful, but beautiful for alla?.Many involved in the project are astronauts on the International Space Station (I.S.S.), who post, on their website (http://www.fragileoasis.org) many different details of their experiments, photos from space, and some incredible video footage of our Earth.One such time lapse video (a video made up many still images) was posted on their website by astronaut Ron Garan (http://www.fragileoasis.org/blog/2011/11/coming-back-down-to-our-fragile-oasis-2/) in 2011. It is made up of images taken from the I.S.S. of what Garan described as a??a?a couple of laps around our Fragile Oasis before coming back down [to Earth]a? and features all kinds of amazing views from space.Each of the five sections of this work relate to an aspect of the video - either something literal or something more metaphorical. The opening section, i: The lights from Above, is a musical description of the view of the Aurora Australis from above the lights. The second section, ii: The Storm from Above (part i), is also a musical portrayal of portions of the video clip - in this case the many lightning storms we see from above. The storms that are so powerful on Earth appear as small bolts of electricity dancing through the clouds.The third section, iii: Freya, has its roots in personal family tragedy. The name Freya derives from a Norse goddess who was associated with both beauty and love, and in this central section I wanted to write music that not only acknowledged how fragile life itself is, but that every day of it counts and should be celebrated.iv: The Storm from Above (part ii) is a again a reference to the lightning storms, but also to the huge hurricanes we see in the video. It leads us to the final section, v: The Oasis from Above - a description of the size and grandeur of Earth, our Fragile Oasis.Fragile Oasis was commissioned by Leyland Brass Band and Michael Bach, and partly funded by The John Golland Trust, for their appearance at the 2013 European Brass Band Championships in Oslo, Norway. It is dedicated to Natalie Youson, in friendship

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £35.00 £35.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    Good King Wenceslas

    Duration: 4:30 Minutes Percussion: 3 PlayersTimpani, Clash Cymbals, Tambourine, Tubular Bells and GlockenspielAll Rights ReservedProgramme NotesThis popular Christmas carol tells the story of a Bohemian King who braved harsh winter weather to give alms to a poor peasant. This takes place on the Feast of Stephen, the first day of Christmas (December 26th). This legend is based on the life of the historical Saint Wenceslas 1, Duke of Bohemia (907 – 935). In 1853 the English hymn writer John Mason Neale wrote his own version of this tale, setting his words to the melody of a 13th century spring carol “Tempus adest floridum” which had first been published in Piae Cantiones (1582). It is this version that has endured to become the popular carol of today.Jock McKenzieJock McKenzie studied trumpet at the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester where he was a joint recipient of the college’s concerto prize. Since 1987 Jock has based his musical career in Hampshire, working as a freelance trumpeter, conductor, composer, arranger and brass teacher. Currently Jock holds the position of Professional Leader (Brass) for Hampshire Music Service and is the Director of the Hampshire County Youth Band. It is the mix of all of these musical roles that has led to Jock establishing a reputation as a leading creator of brass music resources, particularly in the field of education and brass ensemble music.

  • £59.95

    Darkwood - Dan Price

    Darkwood was commissioned in 2012 by Neil Ashcroft, a lifelong member of Blackley Brass Band and was presented to the band in recognition of its 75th Anniversary. The work is in three movements and was conceived as either an extended concert item or as an own choice test-piece.Blackley Village is a northerly district of the city of Manchester and is the home of the last remaining city centre brass band. Blackley appears in the Doomsday book and its name is a derivative of the Anglo-Saxon Bl?cl?"ah which means ‘Darkwood’ or ‘Dark Clearing’.The BoggartThe first movement of the suite is named after Boggart Hole Clough, which is a local urban nature reserve. A clough is a local colloquialism for a steep sided valley or gully and this particular clough is believed to be the home of a Boggart, a mischievous spirit or imp.House on the HillThe second movement of Darkwood is subtitled ‘House on the Hill’ and evokes images of St Andrew’s Church which is located in Higher Blackley and is commonly referred to by this name. Perched high on the hill, it overlooks the village and across the valley towards Manchester city centre.Blackley VillageThe final movement depicts Blackley’s historic evolution from its medieval roots, as a small residential hamlet, through to the present day and its importance as an industrial part of the city.Born in the Vale of Evesham, Worcestershire, Dan took a keen interest in music from an early age playing tuba and trombone with his local brass band. After leaving school he embarked on a 10 year career as a hotelier integrating it with a developing career as a freelance musician playing double bass, sousaphone and bass saxophone with big bands including the internationally Pasadena Roof Orchestra.In 2003, he enrolled in the Band Musicianship course at Salford University where he studied composition and arranging with Prof. Peter Graham. Dan’s first test-piece An Elgar Portrait was selected as the 4th Section set work at the Swiss National Brass Band Championships in 2007 and again at the Pontins Championships the following year. He then went on to write the test-piece New World Sketches which was set as the 2nd Section test-piece for the British Regional Contests in 2009.In 2009, Dan became Composer in Association with the Cory Band, helping them with their winning programmes at several Brass in Concert Championships. In 2012 he became the Arranger in Association with Black Dyke Band and has been involved with many of the band’s exciting projects including his arrangement of Recycled for the ground breaking multimedia campaign – Danger Global Warming Project and the band’s collaboration with British composer Tolga Kashif in 2012 for his Olympic Anthem Let Your Light Shine.In 2015, Dan had a number of major works performed at International contests which included Realms of Asgard: Yggdrassil – a new test-work commissioned by Jaren Hornmusikkforening to be used as their choice work at the Norwegian Brass Band Championships, Ocean of Storms – an exciting new work for Grimethorpe Colliery Band’s Brass in Concert programme and his test-piece Visions which was used as a 4th Section National Finals test-piece.Dan is currently working full time at the University of Salford, lecturing in Composition and Arranging. He continues to work as a freelance composer working with a number of leading soloists, brass and wind bands around the world.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days