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  • £48.00

    This is the Moment - Cornet Solo

    This is the Moment' is a hit song from the musical 'Jekyll & Hyde' - a show loosely based on the novella 'The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'. 'This is the Moment' is sung by Jekyll before he tests the transforming formula on himself in his laboratory. Famous covers of the song include that by The Moody Blues on their official compilation album for the 1994 FIFA World Cup. A Cornet Solo version of the anthem song from Jekyll and Hyde by Frank Wildhorn. A band version of this is also available from us. Please make sure you order the version you need

  • £48.00

    This is the Moment

    'This is the Moment' is a hit song from the musical 'Jekyll & Hyde' - a show loosely based on the novella 'The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'. 'This is the Moment' is sung by Jekyll before he tests the transforming formula on himself in his laboratory. Famous covers of the song include that by The Moody Blues on their official compilation album for the 1994 FIFA World Cup.

  • £57.00

    Disney Around the World - James Christensen

    If you're a Disney fan, this is your moment! This medley for brass band by James Christensen contains many of the great hits from the rich Disney repertoire: Alice in Wonderland, Colonel Hathi's March, I Wanna Be Like You (Jungle Book), It's A Small World, Let's Go Fly A Kate (Mary Poppins), Night on Bald Mountain, Robin Hood, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Under the Sea and Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £59.00

    Disney Around the World - James Christensen

    If you're a Disney fan, this is your moment! This medley for brass band by James Christensen contains many of the great hits from the rich Disney repertoire: Alice in Wonderland, Colonel Hathi's March, I Wanna Be Like You (Jungle Book), It's A Small World, Let's Go Fly A Kate (Mary Poppins), Night on Bald Mountain, Robin Hood, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Under the Sea and Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £129.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £38.00

    Finale from Symphony No. 2 (The Resurrection) - Mahler, G - Harper, P

    One of the most life-affirming pieces of music ever composed, Mahler’s 2nd Symphony, subtitled ‘The Resurrection’, was first performed in Berlin in 1895. Mahler’s interest in the mysteries of the afterlife is well-known and is a recurring theme throughout all his nine symphonies. Philip Harper has arranged the final passages of the 2nd Symphony, which begins with a profound hymn set to the words of Friedrich Klopstock— ‘Rise again, yea, thou shalt rise again’.  The music contains one of Mahler’s magical transitionary passages, building in intensity, before the hymn is restated in all its majesty at the moment of glorious resurrection. This arrangement was performed as the finale to Cory Band’s winning Brass in Concert programme in 2012.Listen to Cory BandCourtesy of World of Brass

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £25.00

    Ring'd with the Azure World

    Ring’d with the Azure World was commissioned by the Harmonia Brass quintet for their final recital at the University of Huddersfield in 2016.He clasps the crag with crooked hands;Close to the sun in lonely lands,Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;He watches from his mountain walls,And like a thunderbolt he falls.– The Eagle by Alfred, Lord TennysonThe music was inspired by Tennyson's poem reproduced above; it seeks simply to reflect the spirit of the poem. It opens in sparse, lonely mood as the eagle surveys the world beneath. The work quickens in three bursts using metrical modulation to disguise the actual moment of acceleration, reflecting the lazy energy stored in the circling raptor before concluding dramatically in a fall 'like a thunderbolt'. Tennyson's poem, although brief, has inspired much analysis and writing, and is notable for being written in the (then somewhat unfashionable) iambic tetrameter, indicating a foursquare emphasis reflected in the main theme of the music. This is heard first in an octatonic version and later in a purely tonal (if somewhat modal) version. The instrumentation reflects that of Harmonia Brass, a quintet composed of brass band instruments (two B flat cornets, an E flat tenor horn, tenor trombone and E flat tuba). However the music is also available for the more conventional brass quintet of two trumpets, french horn, trombone and tuba.

  • £34.95

    Song of the Night Sky - Christopher Bond

    Cornet Solo with Brass BandOrpheus is known as the most talented music player of the ancient times. It is said that god Apollo was his father, from whom took his extreme talent in music, and the Muse Calliope was his mother. Tragedy struck when his wife, Eurydice stepped on a viper which in turn bit her, injecting its fatal venom. Nothing could stop his cries of anguish and sheer pain and sorrow upon realizing his beautiful Eurydice was dead. Orpheus decided to go into the Underworld to get his wife back. Apollo, his father, would talk to Hades, the god of the Underworld to accept him and hear his plea.And so Orpheus set off into the Underworld and was warned that for no reason must he look back while his wife was still in the dark, for that would undo everything he hoped for. As Orpheus was reaching the exit of the Underworld, he could hear the footfalls of his wife approaching him. As his was approaching the exit, his heart was beating faster and faster.The moment he stepped on the world of the living, he turned his head to hug his wife. Unfortunately, he got only a glimpse of Eurydice before she was once again drawn back into the underworld. When Orpheus turned his head, Eurydice was still in the dark, she hadn't seen the sun and, was drowned back to the dark world of the dead. Waves of anguish and despair swept over him and shuddering with grief he approached the Underworld again but this time, he was denied entry, the gates were standing shut and god Hermes, sent by Zeus, wouldn't let him in.His songs were no more joyful but extremely sad. His only comfort was to lay on a huge rock and feel the caress of the breeze, his only vision were the open skies.Song of the Night Sky was recorded by Tom Hutchinson and the Cory Band in June 2015, featuring on his debut solo album.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days