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  • £34.95

    Glory, Hallelujah (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Larsson, Kevin

    This bright and fun setting of the classic Salvation Army song 'Glory, Hallelujah!', which first appeared in 1899, stylistically embraces music associated with Hollywood. Behind all the 'razzmatazz', the direct message is always clear: 'The devil and me we don't agree, Glory, Hallelujah! I hate him and he hates me Glory, Hallelujah!'

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    Glory, Hallelujah (Brass Band - Score only) - Larsson, Kevin

    This bright and fun setting of the classic Salvation Army song 'Glory, Hallelujah!', which first appeared in 1899, stylistically embraces music associated with Hollywood. Behind all the 'razzmatazz', the direct message is always clear: 'The devil and me we don't agree, Glory, Hallelujah! I hate him and he hates me Glory, Hallelujah!'

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £45.00

    strange geometry

    strange geometrywas commissioned by Morgan Griffiths and the Hammonds Saltaire Band for their performance at the Brass in Concert Championships of 2015.As a bit of a space/sci-fi geek, as well as a musician, two events during the summer of 2015 had a particular effect on me. The first was the tragic early death in a plane crash of the famous film composer James Horner. Horner's music, particularly in films like ‘Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan’, ‘Avatar’, ‘Apollo 13’ and even his debut in Roger Corman's 1980 budget film ‘Battle Beyond the Stars’, defined for a generation the sound of sci-fi at the cinema. Along with John Williams he created the vocabulary for those who wish to express other-worldly wonder in music and his inventive talent will be much missed in an industry where originality has become something of a dirty word in recent years.The second event was the epic flyby of Pluto by the NASA New Horizons spacecraft. There are many reasons to find this mission inspiring – for example, the scientists and engineers behind it created a craft that has travelled at 37,000 mph for nine years and three billion miles to arrive within seventy-two seconds of the predicted time for the flyby. That they achieved this with such accuracy is an outstanding tribute to humanity's ingenuity and insatiable curiosity. However, the most exciting aspect of the mission was the clear, high resolution pictures of this unthinkably remote and inhospitable world beamed back to mission control. The best previous image of Pluto was an indistinct fuzzy blob – suddenly we could see mountains made of ice, glaciers of methane and carbon monoxide and nitrogen fog – features previously unimagined on a world thought to be a slightly dull ball of cold rock. The BBC's venerable astronomy programme 'The Sky at Night' waxed lyrical about these newly discovered features, referring to "the surprising discoveries of mountains and strange geometry on the surface of this cold distant world".I like to think that Horner would have been as inspired as I have been by this real-life science story, and this piece uses some of the vocabulary of the sci-fi movie soundtrack in a tribute to the memory of a great musician and to the inspirational geeks at NASA who have boldly taken us where no-one has gone before.Note: This work comes with a B4 score. Click here to view a preview PDF file.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £72.00

    Funky Hedde - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    A good friend of mine, trombonist and professor Jesper Juul Windahl commissioned me a trombone quartet. I then wrote Four Nordic Folk Pops. The last of the four is a Norwegian tune called Havard Hedde in a funky version.Then I made a brass quintet version for Lofoten Brass Quintet for a their Australia tour. The trombonist in the quintet asked me for a brass band version to be used in an entertainment contest (SIDDIS Brass). Havard Hedde did not succeed in getting married, but I think this version wil make him dance again.Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    A Simple Song - Joel Collier

    In 2017 I accepted a new job opportunity that required me to move halfway across the country. While it was an exciting opportunity, it meant leaving behind all the friends and colleagues I had grown to love. A Simple Song was a way for me to express this bittersweet goodbye, both sad to leave people behind, yet hopeful of what was to come. The premiere was given with The National Capital Band, where I had served as principal euphonium since 2011, less than a week before I left. It is dedicated to those I left behind.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £67.80

    Funky Hedde - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    A good friend of mine, trombonist and professor Jesper Juul Windahl commissioned me a trombone quartet. I then wrote Four Nordic Folk Pops. The last of the four is a Norwegian tune called Havard Hedde in a funky version.Then I made a brass quintet version for Lofoten Brass Quintet for a their Australia tour. The trombonist in the quintet asked me for a brass band version to be used in an entertainment contest (SIDDIS Brass).Havard Hedde did not succeed in getting married, but I think this version wil make him dance again.Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £60.00

    Danceries

    In Danceries , by Kenneth Hesketh, the melodies themselves are a mixture of old and new. Where the old occurs it has been adapted in mood and composition and is often interspersed with completely new material. The contemporary harmonies and rhythms bring a breath of new into these themes and add drama to the suite. The first movement, Lull Me Beyond Thee , is gentle and lilting, almost a barcarole, this movement is very much a reverie. The original tune had the name ‘Poor Robin’s Maggot’, a rather disconcerting title; maggot, however, in seventeenth-century parlance meant whim or fancy. The second, Catching of Quails , is a colourful, buoyant scherzo on an original melody. The thematic material is shuttled around the band to contrast with full-blooded tuttis. The last few bars fade to almost nothing, before a final surprise! My Lady’s Rest is a tender pavane, also on an original melody, with Moorish leanings. Beautiful solo passages, expressive contrapuntal writing and warm tuttis provide an opportunity to show off the most lyrical of playing. The final movement, Quodling’s Delight is a clever combination of the 17th century melody, 'Goddesses', with an original contrasting melody, creating a rousing and exuberant finale to the work. A sound clip of the last movement, Quodling's Delight , can be found here Item Code: 0-571-56512-3 Duration: c.15'40"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £64.95

    Platform to the Heavens - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The piece takes its inspiration from the mountain ranges from one of my favourite countries, Switzerland.I have visited the Swiss Alps on many occasions and I am still taken back by its sheer awesome beauty with every visit. This commission gave me the opportunity to pay homage to this wonderful landscape and paint my own musical picture of it.The piece opens with what I imagine daybreak would be like at one of its many peaks. With the sun growing behind the mountain range, the piece builds from a single note to a huge climatic chord revealing Mother Nature’s creation.Then at rehearsal figure ‘C’ the tempo changes dramatically as we fly through the many slopes of the mountains as if on a manic skiing expedition, revealing the many dangers within the Swiss Alps.The twists, turns and climaxes begin to die away as we enter rehearsal figure ‘M’ - nightfall over the mountains. As the sun disappears, the sky darkens to reveal the beautiful starlit sky above the mountain range. This middle section starts with the various cadenzas that serve as echoes around the Alps. It then leads to a lyrical solo at rehearsal figure ‘O’ as the moonlight illuminates the icy mountain peaks. A final cadenza to conclude this section highlights the end of nightfall as the sun starts to rise again.This recapitulation from the opening, signals a new dawn as the sun rises above the snowy peaks once again. The music at this point in its slightly altered state highlights the dawn of a new day in the Alps. The fast manic ski ride follows which takes the piece to its grand finale conclusion.The idea behind the title of this piece is that the Swiss Alps are so beautiful and vast; I can only imagine that they could be a platform connecting the earth to the heavens above.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £24.95

    Auld Lang Syne - Traditional / Simone Mantia

    This solo was originally composed and made famous in the early 1900s by Simone Mantia, the same man responsible for the popular variations on Believe me if all those Endearing Young Charms. Here the solo line is Mantia's original but the arranger has given the accompaniment a more modern treatment. The solo begins with a dashing introduction before the main theme is heard. A set of tricky variations then follow with a couple of cadenzas thrown in for good measure!This arrangement was made at the request of Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band and first performed by David Thornton and Black Dyke Band at the National Brass Band Championships Gala Concert 2004. The solo was subsequently recorded by the same performers and can be heard on Essential Dyke Volume V - Celebrate Rotary (DOYCD193).

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days