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  • £33.00

    Jurassic Park - Williams, J - Catherall, A

    The two main themes from the film. Thesame music has been used in the sequel TheLost World.  Parts of the score are quite difficult, butthere is a cut to overcome many of thetechnical difficulties in the middle section.Six minutes of pure magic. This edition hasremained a popular seller over the years. 3rd section +

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £45.00

    f/m

    f/m was inspired by the internet cartoon 'frequency' by the artist Randall Munroe, which can be seen atxkcd.'Frequency' displays a grid of randomly chosen statistical events which flash at the frequency of their real-time occurrence; an outwardly banal idea with surprisingly profound results. f/m (which – predictably – is short for frequency/modulation) takes a similarly random set of time/duration statistics and uses them to generate the note lengths for each instrument. The first four statistics (and the first brass instrument entries) are derived from physical science. The next eight are all related to the natural world. The final ten, for which the cornets are used, represent contemporary human activity. The percussion instruments maintain a "tick and chime" throughout the work. To view a PDF preview of the score click here.The statistics used are as follows, indicated by numbers in brackets in the score at the first iteration of each one:Lightning strikes the earth 100 times per secondThe first pulsar ever discovered, PSR1919+21, pulses once every 1.337 secondsThere are approximately 10 supernovae every 0.95 secondsEvery 0.6 seconds the entire solar system moves 100 miles around the galactic centreEvery 4.1 seconds a 70 kg human emits 1000 gamma rays due to naturally occurring potassiumA blue whale's heart beats once every 6.67 secondsA hedgehog's heart beats 300/min or 5 times a secondEvery 2 seconds the net population of the world increases by 5There is one birth every 0.24 secondsThere is one death 0.56 seconds5.14 people die of malaria every minute ( one every 11.67 seconds)10 kilotonnes of polar ice are lost on average every 1.4 seconds.Walmart's takes in sales revenue of $10,000 every 1.4 secondsEvery 3 seconds there are 60,000 plastic bags used in US supermarketsEvery 0.72 seconds the world uses 500 tonnes of paperEvery 7.65 seconds, South Korea builds a carEvery 1.75 seconds, China builds a carEvery 5.8 seconds, Germany builds a carEvery 4.7 seconds, the USA builds a truckTwo commercial airline flights take off every 1.86 secondsMacdonalds serves 300 burgers every 4 seconds and feeds 787 people per secondStarbucks uses 3 gallons of milk every second

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £65.00

    Perseverance

    Perseverance was commissioned by Middleton Band to mark their 140th anniversary in 2016, supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, and featured on Middleton Band’s CD of the same name.The title is taken from the original name of the 1876 band, the Middleton Perseverance Drum and Fife Band. According to the band's historical records, the Drum and Fife band was formed by six Middleton youngsters eager to learn music but short of funds. Following a whip round, they visited a music shop in Oldham where they purchased a 'one key flute' for six shillings and sixpence, and ('later on') a drum.This determination to make music despite the odds has been a characteristic of the band ever since; at the end of the second world war the band was again down to six players, who rebuilt the 'Middleton Borough Band' back to twenty-six players. After a period of some considerable success throughout the sixties and seventies culminating in winning the National Third Section title in 1983 the band hit hard times again in the late eighties and was down to only four members in 1987 before again being brought back to life. In recent decades the band has built a strong relationship with the East Lancashire Railway, another organisation which has battled sometimes mighty obstacles in its struggle to survive, and has maintained a thriving and successful youth band.The band's will to survive through adversity is reflected in the music, which builds from a sextet of four brass and two percussion players three times, only to fall back to the sextet twice. In the central slow movement the bass drum plays a 'heartbeat' rhythm as the remaining players remember those lost in the war. The relentless pace of the final section culminates in the band triumphing over the adversity which has curtailed the previous two sections. As a former member of Middleton Band (and one of the team that regained the National Third Section title in 2007) it is my pleasure to dedicate this work to the 'Pop and Ale Boys', Middleton Band.To hear Middleton’s performance of Perseveranceat Rochdale Contest in October 2016 clickhereand read more about the piece here.To viewa PDF preview click here.To view the accompanying video by Andy Marshall, designed to precede the piece, clickhereand find out more about the link between the video and the music here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £24.95

    Lament - Ben Hollings

    Lament was written for the Carlton Main Frickley Colliery Band’s programme of music at the 40th Brass in Concert Championships at the Sage, Gateshead.The programme, based upon the Great Fire of London, tells the story of the fire in 1666. There were between 8-10 deaths recorded as a result of the fire, however once the damage of the fire was realised, the death toll was expected to be much higher. Lament pays tribute to those that lost their lives in the fire, where the reduced brass ensemble is a reflection of the number of lives lost. The piece allows for a moment of reflection in a programme based on such terror and panic.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    HMS Indefatigable - Matt Shaw

    HMS Indefatigable is a contest march, composed for the Virtuosi GUS Band, under the direction of Adam Cooke, and used as part of their programme for Brass in Concert in November 2016.The march is named after the battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable; an ill-fated ship of the British fleet that fell victim to German Bombardment in the Battle of Jutland, in 1916. During the initial 30 minutes of the battle, the Indefatigable sustained heavy fire from the German battleship SMS Von der Tann, which struck Indefatigable’s armoury and caused the ship to suffer a catastrophic explosion, resulting in the ship sinking, with all but two lives lost. 1,017 souls perished.This piece aims to capture the might and power of the great ship at sea, incorporating a touch of menace, hinting at the unfortunate end awaiting the HMS Indefatigable, whilst serving as a fitting tribute to the ship and her crew.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Pageantry - Herbert Howells

    Herbert Howells was born in Gloucestershire in 1892 and, as a youngster, wrote and conducted music for bands in the Forest of Dean, where a strong brass banding tradition still exists. In later life, when an established composer, Howells accepted an invitation to write a test-piece for the 1934 British Open Brass Band Championship. Encouraged by that great friend of the brass band movement, Sir Granville Bantock, he responded with Pageantry, a three movement work, which is still a stiff test for bands today. He undertook the task with great conscientiousness, frequently seeking advice from those more associated with the brass band genre such as Henry Geehl and John Henry Iles. The work was very well received by players and public alike, and still remains part of the core repertoire for brass bands.There are three movements and the first, King's Herald, features fanfares and a demanding animated section. The central slow movement, Cortege, is rather solemn and gives opportunity to display the lyrical qualities of brass instruments. Between February and June 1934, Britain lost three very important musical figures; Elgar, Holst and Delius. Howells was a very sensitive man (as the shattering effect on him of the death of his son revealed two years later) and Elgar had been a particular friend and mentor. It is entirely possible therefore that this elegiac music is a kind of memorial to the great composer ??" it would have been a very typical gesture. Jousts, which ends the work, is a real tour de force for brass and as tough a challenge as anyone could wish.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Pandemic 1349 - Paul McGhee

    ‘Pandemic 1349’ was written during September and October 2016 and received its premiere on Sunday 20 th November at the 40 th Brass in Concert Championships at the Sage, Gateshead where it received the best new composition/arrangement award.‘Pandemic 1349’ is a concert work that aims to capture the atmosphere of fear and terror as the plague spreads throughout the city. The cries and screams get louder and reach a chaotic climax, before a calmer and reflective passage takes over – although the chaos and fear never totally leaves as the melodic material is played against the backdrop of what has gone before.London lost almost half of its population during the Black Death, making this one of the single most devastating events in the city’s dark history. The outbreak not only shaped the number of inhabitants in London but also changed their mind-sets with many turning to religion – even the English language was to be forever altered.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Unity Series Band Journal February 2017 Numbers 450 - 453

    Prelude – A promise (Ruben Schmidt) This bright energetic opener by a young German Salvationist composer features the tune 'Standing on the promises'. My Saviour (Graham Robinson) This is a lively setting of the contemporary song 'When I was lost' and the more traditional 'The Saviour sought and found me' which will give a helpful addition for bands looking for a bright number for their repertoire. Meditation – Boundless Grace (Andrew Blyth) The song 'Lord, I hear of showers of blessing' is the basis of this more traditional style meditation based around the tune 'Even Me'. March – Fired Up! (Martin Cordner) Written for the 130th anniversary of the Woodbridge Corps, this simple yet engaging march brings the tune 'Whitechapel' associated with the song 'Near the cross assembled, Master' with verse three being its focus for the work - "Fire that turns men into heroes".

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days