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  • £35.00

    SYMPHONY No.1, Finale from (Brass Band) - Rachmaninoff, Sergei - Littlemore, Phillip

    Rachmaninov composed his First Symphony in 1895, at the age of just 22 years. It received its first performance on March 27, 1897, at a Russian Symphony Society concert in St. Petersburg with Alexander Glazunov conducting. The premiere was not well-received, and Rachmaninov himself blamed Glazunov for a lacklustre approach for beating time rather than finding the music. Some contemporary reports even suggested that Glazunov was inebriated when he took to the stage! Despite the disappointment of the premiere performance, Rachmaninov never destroyed the score but left it behind when he left Russia to settle in the West, eventually it was given up for lost. After the composer's death, a two-piano transcription of the symphony surfaced in Moscow, followed by a set of orchestral parts at the conservatory in Saint Petersburg. In March 1945, the symphony was performed in Moscow for the first time since its 1897 premiere. It was a grand success, and this led to a new and more enthusiastic evaluation of the symphony. In March 1948 it received a similarly successful American premiere and the work proceeded to establish itself in the general repertory. The final movement (Allegro con fuoco) is colourful and grand but not without its darkly contrasting, menacing episodes that intensifies its malevolence. It is a work overflowing with ideas demonstrating a strong, highly individual, and self-assured young talent. Duration: 5:40

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £35.00

    Finale from 'Symphony No.1' - Sergei Rachmaninov - Phillip Littlemore

    Rachmaninov composed his First Symphony in 1895, at the age of just 22 years. It received its first performance on March 27, 1897, at a Russian Symphony Society concert in St. Petersburg with Alexander Glazunov conducting. The premiere was not well-received, and Rachmaninov himself blamed Glazunov for a lacklustre approach for beating time rather than finding the music. Some contemporary reports even suggested that Glazunov was inebriated when he took to the stage! Despite the disappointment of the premiere performance, Rachmaninov never destroyed the score but left it behind when he left Russia to settle in the West, eventually it was given up for lost. After the composer’s death, a two-piano transcription of the symphony surfaced in Moscow, followed by a set of orchestral parts at the conservatory in Saint Petersburg. In March 1945, the symphony was performed in Moscow for the first time since its 1897 premiere. It was a grand success, and this led to a new and more enthusiastic evaluation of the symphony. In March 1948 it received a similarly successful American premiere and the work proceeded to establish itself in the general repertory. The final movement (Allegro con fuoco) is colourful and grand but not without its darkly contrasting, menacing episodes that intensifies its?malevolence. It is a work overflowing with ideas demonstrating a strong, highly individual, and self-assured?young talent. Iten Code: TPBB-027 Duration: 5'40"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £49.95

    Ruslan & Ludmilla - Mikhail Glinka - Robert Childs

    Glinka's Ruslan & Ludmilla was first performed on December 9, 1842, in St.Petersburg.Once a popular and influential composer, Mikhail Glinka (1804-1857) is primarily remembered today for two operas: A Life for the Tsar (1836) and Ruslan and Ludmilla (1842). The latter, based on the work that brought poet Alexander Pushkin his first success in 1820, seems both a perfect operatic subject and an impossibility.A complicated fairy tale of love overcoming all obstacles, it features a flying dwarf who gets his power from his beard, a fight with a giant disembodied head, a rescue foiled, a slain hero resurrected, and a happy ending with the lovers reunited!Glinka worked intermittently on the Opera for five years and left the composition of the overture to the last minute. Despite the inventiveness of the music and its many memorable melodies, the Opera Ruslan and Ludmilla was a failure. Nevertheless the Overture is a firm favourite and here we have an expertly crafted arrangement for brass band from the pen of Dr Robert Childs.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £25.00

    GREAT GATE OF KIEV, The (from Pictures at an Exhibition) (Brass Band) - Mussorgsky, Modest - Littlemore, Phillip

    Modest Mussorgsky was a close friend of the young artist and architect Victor Hartmann, and his death in 1873 plunged Mossorgsky into a deep depression. The following year a memorial exhibition in St. Petersburg displayed Hartmann's paintings, costumes, architectural designs and sketches. Mussorgsky's visit to it, combined with his desire to write a piece in his friend's memory, inspired him to compose hisPictures At An Exhibitionfor piano. A suite of ten movements, with a recurring Promenade theme, it is one of the composer's most famous works and regarded as a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It is perhaps the orchestral transcription made by Maurice Ravel in 1922 that is now the most famous version of it. This arrangement opens with a brief excerpt fromThe Hut on Fowl's Legs, which was based on a painting of an elaborately carved clock depicting Baba Yaga, a horrible tiny witch that feasts on human bones. The tenth, and final picture in Mussorgsky's masterpiece is commonly referred to asThe Great Gate of Kiev, although it's literal translation is The Bogatyr Gates ??" a Bogatyr being a hero figure in medieval East Slavic legend. It features a grand main theme that is interspersed with a more solemn hymn-like secondary theme. The work closes with a grand final rendition of the Promenade theme that almost grinds to a halt at what must be the foot of what were to be magnificent ceremonial gates (although they were never actually built!). Duration: 6:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £30.00

    Coronation Scene - Modest Mussorgsky - Phillip Littlemore

    Few operas have had such a remarkable history as Mussorgsky’s masterpiece Boris Godunov . It exists in no less than three complete versions by the composer himself, as well as posthumous editions and orchestrations by Rimsky-Korsakov (from which this arrangement is taken), Shostakovich and others. The Coronation Scene is set in the Square of the Moscow Kremlin, between the Cathedral of the Assumption and the Cathedral of Archangel Michael, the year is 1598. After being crowned as Tsar, Boris Godunov acknowledges the people’s acclamations and the bells of the two cathedrals, as well as many churches within the vicinity, can be heard ringing out across St Petersburg. A sound clip of this piece can be found here Item Code: 0-571-56512-4 Duration: c.6'10"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £25.00

    The Great Gate of Kiev - Phillip Littlemore

    Modest Mussorgsky was a close friend of the young artist and architect Victor Hartmann, and his death in 1873 plunged Mossorgsky into a deep depression. The following year a memorial exhibition in St. Petersburg displayed Hartmann’s paintings, costumes, architectural designs and sketches. Mussorgsky’s visit to it, combined with his desire to write a piece in his friend’s memory, inspired him to compose his Pictures At An Exhibition for piano. A suite of ten movements, with a recurring Promenade theme, it is one of the composer’s most famous works and regarded as a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It is perhaps the orchestral transcription made by Maurice Ravel in 1922 that is now the most famous version of it. This arrangement opens with a brief excerpt from The Hut on Fowl’s Legs , which was based on a painting of an elaborately carved clock depicting Baba Yaga, a horrible tiny witch that feasts on human bones. The tenth, and final picture in Mussorgsky’s masterpiece is commonly referred to as The Great Gate of Kiev , although it’s literal translation is The Bogatyr Gates — a Bogatyr being a hero figure in medieval East Slavic legend. It features a grand main theme that is interspersed with a more solemn hymn-like secondary theme. The work closes with a grand final rendition of the Promenade theme that almost grinds to a halt at what must be the foot of what were to be magnificent ceremonial gates (although they were never actually built!). Item Code: TPBB-045 Duration: c. 6'00"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days