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  • £29.95

    My Strength, My Tower - Rhapsodic Variations (Brass Band - Score only) - Goffin, Dean

    This music consists of a theme followed by five extensive variations. The theme is the composer's own tune set to the words, 'Thee will I love, my strength, my tower', a hymn by Johann Scheffler translated by John Wesley. A strong modal flavour is characteristic of the theme. Variation 1: This is a light and graceful variation with a good deal of imitative writing. It leads, without a break, into the next variation. Variation 2: Fire and ferocity are asked for in the course of this variation. Variation 3: This variation demonstrates the original approach of the composer. Solo lines for cornet and euphonium are included with their arabesques and arpeggii. Variation 4: Taking the form of a passacaglia, the 'ground' is given out at once by the basses. Fragments of the 'ground', plain or decorated, are combined and used in a number of ways, revealing the composer's mastery of counterpoint. Variation 5: The briskly moving and scintillating final variation abounds in sudden variations of dynamic. The tempo remains constant until an increase is called for in the coda. This 'contest' version has been prepared by Brian Bowen who was asked to re-work the percussion part and introduce a repiano cornet part (Salvation Army band publications do not, in general, have a part for repiano cornet).

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    Illuminate - Andrew Wainwright

    Illuminate was composed for the Chicago Staff Band’s performance at The Salvation Army’s Boundless International Congress 2015 at London’s O2 Arena. The music takes the listener on a journey of a Christian life, a life that is called to be a light in this dark world. The work starts out in optimistic fashion, with various musical pictures describing the joy of someone who has just received Christ into their life. Referencing Matthew 5:14-16, ‘And you beloved, are the light of the world, a city built on a hilltop cannot be hidden. Similarly it would be silly to light a lamp and then hide it under a bowl. When someone lights a lamp, she puts it on a table… and the light illuminates the entire house. You are like that illuminating light.’ (The Voice)Three songs are featured, firstly Shine on us (Michael W. Smith), with references to Speak, O Lord (Keith Getty & Stuart Townend), which is later heard in its complete form in the middle section in a time of reflection. Here there is a plea to ‘Speak, O Lord, as we come to You, to receive the power of Your Holy Word’, before a declaration ‘…That the light of Christ might be seen today in our acts of love and our deeds of faith.’ This time of challenge ends with the poignant promise sounded by Evangeline Booth’s song, The World for God, in the solo flugel horn: ‘The world for God! I give my heart! I’ll do my part!’The final movement is full of unrelenting energy, with references again to Matthew 5:16: ‘Let your light shine everywhere you go, that you may illuminate creation, so men and women everywhere may see your good actions, may see creation at its fullest, may see your devotion to me and may turn and praise your Father in Heaven because of it.’ The song Shine on us returns in full glory as a call to the Lord to ‘Let your light, light of your face, shine on us.’ However, this time the tune is juxtaposed with both The World for God and Speak, O Lord, and the challenge for us all to go out into the world and be shining lights.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    Now Is The Hour - Ray Steadman-Allen

    This romantic Maori song of farewell was arranged as a cornet solo for David Daws. Within The Salvation Army, the words 'Search me, O God, and know my heart today' are now associated with this beautiful tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £55.00

    Purcell Variations - Kenneth Downie

    Purcell Variations, composed in 1995, the year of the tercentenary of the death of the great English composer, was a watershed work in that it was Downie's first extended composition to be published independently of The Salvation Army and intended for wider use. For his theme, Downie has chosen what has come down to us as the hymn tune Westminster Abbey, which is in fact an adaptation made in 1842 by Ernest Hawkins, who was a Canon of Westminster Abbey where Purcell himself had been organist. Purcell’s original is actually the closing section of an anthem, O God, Thou art my God, where it provides the final paean of praise, sung to repeated ‘Hallelujahs’. Purcell’s tune, particularly the opening triadic gesture, is used as a source of thematic and harmonic material – a quarry for ideas if you like: “I was obsessed with the intervals of thirds in Purcell’s tune, rather like Brahms in his Third Symphony”, the composer says.There are five variations, preceded by an extended introduction and theme. In the first variation, Purcell’s lilting dance pulse has been transformed into a bright, playful sequence, in which each phrase of the melody is given its own transformation. In the second, Purcell’s opening gambit is extended into a graceful, flowing waltz, featuring solo and first horn at the top of the register. The composer offers a range of metronome speeds in this movement, in which he is emulating the wistful elegance of Erik Satie’s famous Gymnopedie. We enter the world of big band jazz in variation three, where Purcell’s tune strides along with added syncopation and bluesy major/minor thirds to the fore. After the breathless energy and blazing brass of the big band, Downie moves into his ‘home territory’ for a beautifully worked lyrical variation. There is an enhanced urgency about the final variation, which opens with an extended reprise of the work’s introduction. Purcell’s second and third phrases provide the preparation for the exuberant return, in customary triumph of Purcell’s ‘Hallelujah’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days