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  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.00

    All Cried Out - Peter Kleine Schaars

    At the beginning of the 1980s Alison Moyet was discovered by Vince Clarke, who - in search of greater independence - had left the successful band Depeche Mode. The soulful singing style of Moyet and the electronic, innovative pop that Clarke made melded well together in the group Yazoo with hits such as Only You and Don't Go. However, after a number of years Moyet went her own way and forged a solo career, during which she demonstrated a somewhat more traditional sound. She recorded several covers (such as The First Time I Ever Saw Your Face and That Ole Devil Called Love) but she also wrote fine songs herself, such as Love Resurrection and, of course, the expressive song All Cried Out. This arrangement by Peter Kleine Schaars does justice to the atmosphere of the original song.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilisations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.Duration: 18:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £29.95

    Jack in a Box - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    From the many musicians I have had the privilege to compose for this piece has probably been the most enjoyable.The reason being was because I was approached by members of the Bilton Silver (Rugby) Band to compose a xylophone solo for one of their young percussionists Jack Fisher. Jack is no stranger to me as I have had the privilege to teach him whilst he has been a student with the National Children’s Brass Band of Great Britain. He certainly is a player to watch out for in the future and not only is he talented; he is also a great character as well.When the members of Bilton Silver Band conversed with me about the proposed commission, they said they wanted a solo that represented Jack’s cheeky and fun loving nature. They also wanted a solo that wasn’t too demanding for the young starlet and so it gave the opportunity for other up and coming percussionists to play as well.The piece is quick and fun and it provides a solo for percussionists who are developing as players to work on. It is enjoyable to listen to and it’s proving to be a bit of a foot-tapper as well with audiences.When I was a child I had an old Jack-in-a-box toy that played the nursery rhyme pop goes the weasel before Jack popped out and scared the life out of me. So for a bit of fun I have quoted pop goes the weasel in the solo which aptly lead me to the suitable title for the piece Jack in a Box.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.99 £29.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Vincero | Edward Mylechreest

    This piece, written for Brass Band takes it's inspiration from the words of the concluding cry of the aria Nessun Dorma from Puccini's opera Turandot.With film-like quality Vincero; which means 'I will be victorious',wouldn't sound out of place underscoring the likes of 'Braveheart'. Compelling 12/8 rhythms provide the foundation. Vincero is one of those pieces you can't help tapping your feet too. A stirring work with broad melodies and catchy accompaniment. Time to liven up your concert program!

  • £35.00 £35.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    Moose on the Loose

    “I had a dream of a moose that escapes captivity and heads towards the city. At first he has a ball with all the new things to see but as he approaches the centre he gradually despairs at the chaos of the crowds of people and traffic. In the end he flees desperately out of the city and slams himself back into his cage. The piece is clearly a homage to Shostakovich and perhaps shouldn’t be taken too seriously” - Mark Hamlyn.Duration: 4:00 minutesPercussion: 3 Players playing timpani, snare drum and cymbals Grade 4: Moderately Difficult 1st Section Bands

  • £21.50

    The Land Before Time - James Horner - Gavin Somerset

    The music of James Horner is known around the world for his strong, heart-warming melody lines that featured in such films at 'Titanic' and 'An American Tail'. Released in 1988, 'The Land Before Time' was made by the same film creators of 'An American Tail' and so, James Horner and Will Jennings were the obvious choice to create the movie's soundtrack, following the success of 'Somewhere Out There' (from 'An American Tail'). They didn't disappoint, and the main title track 'If We Hold On Together' became a success both on the screen and off when it was released as a single by Diana Ross in 1989. Now arranged by Gavin Somerset, this release will take a generation back in time to the story of Littlefoot, who embarks upon journey with 4 friends as they search for the Great Valley. A great item for all bands

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Salsalvation (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Mackereth, Andrew

    In writing this piece the composer set out to emulate the sound of the Stan Kenton big band and music of that 'golden' era. The piece itself is based around two Salvation Army tunes that are associated with the word, 'salvation'; Steadily forward march! (T.B. 799) and Hark, hark, my soul (T.B.542). The music is intentionally flamboyant and requires a secure grasp of the style and rhythm to be successful. It was featured at the Belfast Temple Music School to great effect.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days