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  • £29.95

    Dalaro (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The name of Edward Gregson is well known in Salvationist circles as well as in the wider music world, his music receiving performances and being recorded and published regularly. This music is individual and of high worth with an assured technique. It is always a pleasurable task for the musician to handle music with these qualities, whether one is editor, conductor or player. Written in connection with the International Salvation Army Students' Fellowship Conference held in Dalaro, Sweden in 1964, this is a 'festival' rather than processional march. Section C is a tune from the Swedish Tune Book (No. 303 in the 1945 edition), Jag gar till det land dar ovan (I go to that Land above). There is a slight divergence from the tune book version (labelled, by the way, as an English tune); this could well be the manner in which the tune is sung - we are all aware of the way in which congregations modify tunes.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £14.95

    Dalaro (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The name of Edward Gregson is well known in Salvationist circles as well as in the wider music world, his music receiving performances and being recorded and published regularly. This music is individual and of high worth with an assured technique. It is always a pleasurable task for the musician to handle music with these qualities, whether one is editor, conductor or player. Written in connection with the International Salvation Army Students' Fellowship Conference held in Dalaro, Sweden in 1964, this is a 'festival' rather than processional march. Section C is a tune from the Swedish Tune Book (No. 303 in the 1945 edition), Jag gar till det land dar ovan (I go to that Land above). There is a slight divergence from the tune book version (labelled, by the way, as an English tune); this could well be the manner in which the tune is sung - we are all aware of the way in which congregations modify tunes.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £91.00

    Clann Lir - Stijn Aertgeerts

    Clann Lir - Stijn Aertgeerts - 8'30'' - BVT123 THE CHILDREN OF LIR: AN IRISH LEGEND There was a time in ancient Ireland when the people believed in magic and in druids and spells. These were the days of the Tuatha De Danann tribe, the Goddess Danu and of Lir, the lord of the sea. Lir's wife, Eva, had given him four beautiful children. The two eldest, Fionnuala and Aodh, went swimming in a small lake. But these were no ordinary swimmers! They possessed gills for breathing and webbed feet as they were, after all, the offspring of 'the ruler of the land beneath the waves'. They met a messenger who told them that they were wanted by their father. They went home immediately only to find their father disturbed. 'What is wrong father?' they enquired ‘your mother has given birth to twins' he replied ‘....and has gone off to rest' 'What do you mean father?' they asked Lir explained that this was what humans called 'death' but that since they were immortal that their mother had gone to recover, possibly for a thousand years or more. The children were to look after the new brothers, Fiachra and Conn. The children kissed their mother for the last time and then left. As the children grew Lir's spirits declined until one day he met Aoife, the sister of his wife. Aoife was possessed of magical powers and soon enough it was known that she and Lir would marry. The new family thrived under the influence of their new mother but not for long as guilt and jealousy about the children's real mother took its toll on Aoifes health. She fell into sickness for a year but recovered only to start to become old before here time. Aoife was a changed woman now and one day suggested that she and the children should visit their grandfather. On the journey they stopped by a lake and she encouraged the children to go for a swim. The four children played happily in the water, not noticing that their stepmother was now standing at the water’s edge wearing her father’s magic cloak. 'For too long you children have stood between your father and I, but not for much longer!' she cried'We cannot be killed by you...' Aodh replied, ‘...we are the Children of Lir and if you harm us our ghosts will haunt you!' 'I’m not going to kill you.....' she shouted ‘......but I am going to change you!' At this she bowed her head and started an incantation. The children looked at each other in fear as they saw a red and gold circle envelope them on the water. They saw Aoife open up her cloak from which the great light of a fireball emerged and hurtled towards them, burning all in its wake. The fireball hit the water and caused masses of steam to rise about the children and they soon lost all feeling in their legs, arms, shoulders and head. They soon regained their sight only to see Aoife laughing at them. Aodh tried to attack her and flailed his arms about furiously but nothing happened except the splashing of water. He turned to look at his brothers and sister only to see that they had all been turned into the most beautiful swans ever seen. Aoife scowled at them again and told them that they were to spend nine hundred years as swans, three hundred on Lough Derravaragh, three hundred on the Straits of Moyle and three hundred on the Isle of Inish Glora. To end the spell they would have to hear the bell of the new God. -'I leave you with your voice however, and the most beautiful singing ever heard' she said. Clann Lir was Commisioned by K.F. De Vrije Vlaamse Zonen (Kapelle-op-den-Bos)Percussion parts assisted by Sam Coenen

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £10.00

    Endurance

    DescriptionMen wanted for hazardous journey.Small wages, bitter cold,long months of complete darkness,constant danger, safe return doubtful.Honour and recognition in case of success.– Ernest Shackleton, 4 Burlington StreetEndurance takes its title from the ship used by Sir Ernest Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1914-15. After many months of fundraising (and reputedly running the above advert in The Times) the Endurance set sail from Plymouth on 6 August 1914. Whilst at sea news of the outbreak of war led Shackleton to put his ship and crew at the disposal of the Admiralty, but their services were not required and they were encouraged to continue. On October 26 1914 they left Grytviken on South Georgia for the Antarctic continent, hoping to find the pack ice shrinking in the Antarctic spring. Two days later, however, they encountered unseasonable ice which slowed their progress considerably. On 15 January 2015, when Endurance was only 200 miles from her intended landfall at Vahsel Bay, the ship became beset by ice which had been compressed against the land to the south by gale force winds. Trapped in the ice of the Weddell Sea, the ship spent the Antarctic winter driven by the weather further from her intended destination until, on 21 November 1915 Endurance broke up forcing the crew to abandon ship and set up camp on the ice at a site they named "Patience Camp".The crew spent several weeks on the ice. As the southern spring started to reduce the extent of the ice shelf they took to their three lifeboats, sailing across the open ocean to reach the desolate and uninhabited Elephant Island. There they used two of the boats to build a makeshift shelter while Shackleton and five others took the largest boat, an open lifeboat named the 'James Caird' and sailed it for 800 terrifyingly dangerous miles across the vast and lonely Southern Atlantic to South Georgia – a journey now widely regarded as one of the greatest and most heroic small-boat journeys ever undertaken. After landing on the wrong side of the island and having to climb over a mountain range in the dark with no map, Shackleton and his companions finally stumbled back into the Grytviken whaling station on 19 May 1916.After resting very briefly to recover his strength, Shackleton then began a relentless campaign to beg or borrow a ship to rescue the rest of his crew from Elephant Island; whaling ships were not strong enough to enter polar ice, but on 30 August 1916, over two years after their departure from Plymouth, Shackleton finally returned to Elephant Island aboard a steam tug borrowed from the Chilean government. Although some were in poor health, every member of the Endurance crew was rescued and returned home alive.Endurance is dedicated to the memory of my mum, who passed away in September 2017.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £32.00

    The Beacons (Score only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    For centuries hilltop beacon fires blazed across the land signals of important happenings or warnings of invasion. This music tells no specific story but the titles of the four thematically related sections are a guide to the idea: The Beacons; Far Horizons; The Invaders; Celebration. The first movement has something of the character of the march and the fanfare; spirited and tightly driving, it promises most of the thematic material of the work. The second is largelt tranquil and is thinly scores with solo passages. The third has the most dramatic potential; its energy and conflict subsides to a lament and a tolling bell before a vigorous rounding off. Appropriately, the fourth movement is in a merry-making mood, and the jubilant music concludes with fragment statements of the main themes. The Beacons was first performed by IMI Yorkshire Imperial Band (James Scott) at the 'Concert of the Century', celebrating the Centenary of the British Bandsman, at the Free Trade Hall, Manchester, on 5 September 1987. Duration: 12:30

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £42.00

    The Beacons (Parts only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    For centuries hilltop beacon fires blazed across the land signals of important happenings or warnings of invasion. This music tells no specific story but the titles of the four thematically related sections are a guide to the idea: The Beacons; Far Horizons; The Invaders; Celebration. The first movement has something of the character of the march and the fanfare; spirited and tightly driving, it promises most of the thematic material of the work. The second is largelt tranquil and is thinly scores with solo passages. The third has the most dramatic potential; its energy and conflict subsides to a lament and a tolling bell before a vigorous rounding off. Appropriately, the fourth movement is in a merry-making mood, and the jubilant music concludes with fragment statements of the main themes. The Beacons was first performed by IMI Yorkshire Imperial Band (James Scott) at the 'Concert of the Century', celebrating the Centenary of the British Bandsman, at the Free Trade Hall, Manchester, on 5 September 1987. Duration: 12:30

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    The Fire & the Phoenix - Christopher Bond

    For Trombone & Brass Band, Written for & Commissioned by Brett BakeThe Fire & the Phoenix (2015) was commissioned by Brett Baker in early 2015 as the opening track to his solo CD 'Myths & Legends'. Whilst structurally a single-movement work, it is presented so that it can link directly into the next work on the CD, adding to a continuous theme comprising a number of pieces from a number of composers.Opening with huge strident chords in the full band, the representation of the phoenix is instantly reflected; bold, powerful and a bird of great intensity. This makes way for a more mystical section marked 'distant' which reflect the beauty of the Phoenix and it's mythical nature where the trombone soars up into its higher register with a sweeping melody. Soon after, the music takes a sharp turn, becoming dramatic and instantly moving away from the mystical mood created previously. Here, we imagine the Phoenix catching fire, burning intensely with huge flames as it gradually turns into ash. We reach a tonic pedal point in the music, over which chord progressions subtly weave in and out of the texture. Here, we imagine the Phoenix rising from the ashes, with the dynamics gradually increasing to reflect this, slowly taking shape as it is born again. A return to earlier material follows, this time manipulated to reflect the Phoenix in its new form - the same bird; the same animal; but at the same time different. A beautiful chorale-like passage is heard before the music transports us back into a magical land, where delicate rhythmic ideas are juxtaposed against bolder lower chords; both ideas together transporting the listener forward into the next piece.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £35.00

    Blue Thunder - Dan Price

    Brass Band Concert Series - Grade 3.5 A toe tapping concert item with choreography to add a visual dimension by Dan Price. Commissioned in 2013 by the National Children's Band of Great Britain for their 10th Anniversary, Blue Thunder takes inspiration from the fast and noisy world of steam locomotives. The Mallard 4468 is a LNER Pacific steam locomotive and was famous for setting the world land speed record (126mph). Blue Thunder (a reference to the train's colour and lightning speed) also marks the 75th anniversary of this world record. The music imitates the sounds and excitement of a steam train on its journey with some added choreography which adds to the excitement. Duration: 00:04:45 Grade 3.5 Follow this link to watch Blue Thunder being premiered by the National Children's Band of Great Britain:

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £59.99

    Lyonesse (Score & Parts) (Brass Band/Score & Parts) - Simon Dobson

    was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the Finals of the National Youth Brass Band Championships held in Manchester in April 2005. This atmospheric music, ideal as a test piece for First and Second section bands, takes its inspiration from the lost kingdom of Lyonesse, the mythical spur of land linking Cornwall and the Scilly Isles, and its associated legend of Tristan and Isolde.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days