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  • £49.20

    British, TV @ War - Easy

    Medley including: It Ain't Half Hot Mum - from Meet The Gang

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Rhapsody in Brass - Dean Goffin

    Rhapsody in Brass is in three movements and was written for the British Open Championships in 1949, held at Belle Vue in Manchester. The contest winners were Fairey Aviation Works Band under the baton of Harry Mortimer. Eric Ball came second with Ransome & Marles and Stanley Boddington 3rd with Munn and Felton Band. Rhapsody in Brass had the unusual distinction of being written as a test piece by a Salvation Army composer. Eric Ball's Resurgam was the only other piece to achieve that dual personality in that era.Dean Goffin was born in 1916 in Wellington, New Zealand, son of Henry Goffin, a Salvation Army officer and composer. At 19 he was appointed Bandmaster of the Wellington South Band and when World War II started, he enlisted in the New Zealand Armed Forces where he became Bandmaster of the 20th Infantry Battalion and later the 4th Brigade Band. During the time he served with them in the Middle East and Europe, he composed and arranged numerous pieces among which Rhapsody in Brass and the march Bel Hamid, later adapted for Salvation Army use and renamed Anthem of the Free.After the war, Dean kept on composing and his work was featured by the Wellington South Band. Later he transferred to Timaru for another job and became Bandmaster there. He was studying music at the time and as he wanted to take part in a competition for devotional selections for Salvation Army use, he sent some of his compositions to the International Headquarters. When Rhapsody for Brass was chosen as the test-piece for the British Open Championships, people at the Salvation Army started asking questions about the lack of publications of his work. It was discovered that the pieces submitted for the competition didn't meet the exact criteria. Among these pieces was one of his most appealing works The Light of the World which was published a year later, in 1950, the same year as he completed his Bachelor of Music studies at Otagu University.After entering the Salvation Army Training College in Wellington with his wife, Marjorie, Dean was in 1956 appointed National Bandmaster in the British Territory. Later he became National Secretary for Bands and Songster Brigades and in this period he organised the yearly festival in the Royal Albert Hall and was responsible for the national music schools in the UK. Dean returned to his home country in 1966 and to mark the centenary of the Salvation Army in New Zealand he was knighted by the Queen in 1983. Sir Dean Goffin died on 23 January 1984.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Peacemakers - Dan Price

    Peacemakers was composed for Robert Childs and the Grimethorpe Colliery Band. It received its world premiere on November 17th 2014 at The Sage and concluded their winning ‘Brass in Concert' program, ‘Lest We Forget'.As well as commemorating the centenary of World War I, 2014 also marked the 75th Anniversary of the outbreak of Word War II. Dan Price's Peacemakers pays tribute to those who fought, and uses two contrasting musical ideas as its basis. The motifs and material for the first theme take inspiration from Morse code patterns, and as the work nears a triumphant close the allied forces of World War II are remembered through the words of British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill broadcast on 20th August 1940. This speech can be narrated. Alternatively, a free audio download is available from the downloads section of this site.Peacemakers has been recorded by Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their CD 'Grimethorpe Entertain' available to buy here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £65.00 £65.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    A Wartime Sketchbook by William Walton, arr. Paul Hindmarsh

    During World War II, William Walton, one of the most eminent of British composers, provided music for several films deemed to be of 'national importance'. Scoring Lawrence Olivier's Shakespeare epic Henry V in 1943 was the most substantial of these wartime projects. His role in patriotic films from 1941 and 42 like The Foreman Went to France, Next of Kin, Went the day Well? and The First of the Few was to provide appropriate title music and some underscoring at key moments. Walton extracted the most substantial portions of the latter as the popular Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra. The remaining music remained unpublished until 1990, when Christopher Palmer assembled the highlights from the soundtracks into A Wartime Sketchbook, ssix numbers of which were arranged into a colourful suite for Besses o' th' Barn and Black Dyke Mills bands in the 1990s. 1. Prologue: This is the stirring title music from Went the day Well?, a screen play by Graham Greene about a German airborne invasion of an English village. The main theme leads to (2) Bicycle Chase, characteristic musical high-jinks for J.B.Priestley's The Foreman went to France. (3) Refugees, from the same film, is a poignant accompaniment to the long march of refugees, while (4) Young Siegfrieds is a lively movement comes from the music that Walton composed for The Battle of Britain in 1968, but which the film's producer rejected. It portrays first the Berliners, cheerfully ignoring the black-out and then, in the trio, the Young Siegfrieds of the Luftwaffe, courtesy of a parody of Siegfried's horn call from Wagner's opera. In (5) Romance from Next of Kin, a soldier and a Dutch refugee snatch a few tender moments together. (6) Epilogue: at the end of The Foreman went to France, the French look forward with hope and optimism to eventual liberation. Romance (3') and Young Siegrfireds (4') can be performed separately. Duration: 14 mins Published by arrangement with the copyright holders, Oxford University Press. ?65, plus postage and packingPHM Catalogue No. PHM008

  • £29.95

    UNDER TWO FLAGS (Brass Band Set) - Bramwell Coles

    The catalyst for this march came during Bramwell Coles' brief service in the Royal Army Medical Corps at the end of World War One. It was intended as a salute to British Salvationists serving in the Armed Forces and includes quotations from several national airs like Rule Britannia, Men of Harlech, Bluebells of Scotland and God save the King (Queen).

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.99 £49.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Poppyfields | Kevin Bell

    It is 4.15am on 8th August 1918, and a British soldier waits for the whistle which will send him 'over the top' and into battle. Beginning with the Battle, entering a dream-like section as our hero advances forwards, followed by random skirmishes, before Battle ends and we enter a lyrical reflective section where the soldiers thoughts turn to home. Finally a lone cornet heralds a tribute to the Fallen, and answered by the euphonium, calls for hope for a new dawn and a better world. There is an optional narration from our soldierbefore the piece starts, and alsohis reflections of war and home after the battle is over, however the piece is written to be played with or without narration. This piece by Kevin Bell has it all: excitement, surprise, reflection and hope.