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  • £29.95

    Be My Love - Nicholas Brodszky & Sammy Cahn - Ray Farr

    Be My Love was immortalized by the famous operatic tenor Mario Lanza. This version for euphonium and brass band was expertly crafted by Ray Farr in the late 80's for the Grimethorpe Colliery Band and one of the best euphonium players of all time, Nicholas Childs. This arrangement is available with piano, brass band or wind band accompaniments.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £24.95

    Be My Love - Nicholas Brodszky

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    JOY THROUGH THE AGES (Brass Band Set) - Howard Evans

    This work was written for the 125th anniversary of Boscombe Band, celebrated in November 2011, and is the title track of the band' album released in the same year. The music is celebratory in nature and is dedicated to all those who have served in the band during its 125 year history. The theme of the work is a song by Charles Hutchison Gabriel which was the favourite of the band's librarian, Gerald Whittingham, who was 'promoted to Glory' after a long battle with a brain tumour. The title comes from the last verse, 'When with the ransomed in Glory, his face I at last shall see, 'twill be my joy through the ages, to sing of his love for me'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    Joy Through The Ages (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Evans, Howard J.

    This work was written for the 125th anniversary of Boscombe Band, celebrated in November 2011, and is the title track of the band' album released in the same year. The music is celebratory in nature and is dedicated to all those who have served in the band during its 125 year history. The theme of the work is a song by Charles Hutchison Gabriel which was the favourite of the band's librarian, Gerald Whittingham, who was 'promoted to Glory' after a long battle with a brain tumour. The title comes from the last verse, 'When with the ransomed in Glory, his face I at last shall see, 'twill be my joy through the ages, to sing of his love for me'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.50

    Joy Through The Ages (Brass Band - Score only) - Evans, Howard J.

    This work was written for the 125th anniversary of Boscombe Band, celebrated in November 2011, and is the title track of the band' album released in the same year. The music is celebratory in nature and is dedicated to all those who have served in the band during its 125 year history. The theme of the work is a song by Charles Hutchison Gabriel which was the favourite of the band's librarian, Gerald Whittingham, who was 'promoted to Glory' after a long battle with a brain tumour. The title comes from the last verse, 'When with the ransomed in Glory, his face I at last shall see, 'twill be my joy through the ages, to sing of his love for me'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Mansions of Glory - Score & Parts - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Mansions of Glory - Score Only - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £53.00

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £37.50

    Postcard from Mexico - H. Snell

    I wrote Postcard from Mexico for a BBC TV contest, because I urgently needed a finisher to provide an exciting and powerful end to the programme. PFM did the trick and to my surprise immediately became popular with bands and audiences. I evoked the atmosphere of Mexican music with nods towards Aaron Copland, Chavez and Ginastera. However the responsability for most of it, particularly the rhythmic difficulties and the unusual drunken middle section, must be laid at my door. We grade it 2 and 3 because, while difficult, so many bands love to tangle with its problems.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days