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  • £29.95

    Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Selections - Sherman, Richard MArranger:

    Includes: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang; Truly Scrumptious; Hush-a-bye Mountain; Me Ol'Bamboo.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £29.95

    Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Selection

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £60.00

    B of the Bang - Meechan Peter

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £193.50

    Big Bang - Suite de Concert - Crausaz

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £25.50

    Hushabye Mountain - R & R Sherman - Jonathan Bates

    Originally arranged for Owen Farr, Hushabye Mountain is a well-loved and cherished song by the renowned Sherman Brothers from the 1968 motion picture, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. The work is undoubtedly one of the most popular songs from the show. The song acts as an idyllic lullaby, sang by Caracatus Potts as he sends his children to sleep. This arrangement, as a tenor horn solo by Fodens Band’s Principal horn Jonathan Bates, features the tuned percussion throughout, and sets the melody initially over a music-box-like idea, before more dreamy and tranquil soundscapes enter.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £38.00

    13.7 Billion Years Earlier - James McFadyen

    Brass band sheet music by James McFadyen. Listen to the glorious sound of the Central Ohio Brass Band perform this grand and magical fanfare. Described as a fanfare tone poem, 13.7 Billion Years Earlier tells the story of the beginning of our universe, the big bang. Based around the note of concert Db, this is poetic brass band music with flowing melodic lines and deep evocative harmonies, gradually building to glorious and magical ending. Since the conception of this music, the most recent accurate measurement of the universe is now 13.8 billion years old.What is the Big Bang?The Big Bang is the leading theory of how our universe came to be. All of space, time and matter in our universe was created at that moment. Everything you see around you comes from that moment 13.8 billion years ago. The term "big bang" was coined by Fred Hoyle (1915-2001), a British astronomer who supported the opposing theory of the time - Steady State Theory.At the heart of the Big Bang theory is Inflation, as developed by Alun Guth (b.1947).Over the years, the evidence to support the Big Bang theory mounted up, and has been so consistent with the model that to argue against the big bang would require a substantial amount of opposing evidence not yet observed.Evidence to support the Big Bang theory includes (amongst others) pigeon droppings at the big ear telescope in Ohio (USA), WMAP image of the universe and the discovery of redshift demonstrating the expanding universe.More Space Brass Band Sheet Music2019 marks 50 years of the first moon landing. If you're looking for original music for brass band with a space theme, you're at the right place. If you like 13.7 Billion Years Earlier and looking for something along the same lines, The Pale Blue Dot by the same composer is the perfect choice. With it's 5/4 time signature and lyrical melody over a pulsing ostinato building to a heart-pumping ending, it's the perfect set of tones for your concert.For those after a more energetic piece, Magnus Hylander's Sunrise is sure to fit the bill. The calm and peaceful start is not unlike something from that of Philip Sparke, and when the piece gets going, it's a great concert piece that moves along at a fair pace.The "Wow!" Signal by James McFadyen is a 3-part concert work based on the 1977 signal found in the constellation of Sagittarius. In fast-slow-fast form, this original extended work is a great way to showcase your bands musical prowess whilst giving the audience a new sonic experience.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £142.99

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of theuniverse and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek,which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined toweave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a namegiven by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows calledThe Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe.Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continuallyexpanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £142.99

    Music of the Spheres (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilisations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.Duration: 18:00

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £55.00

    The World's Greatest Storyteller - Bricusse, L & Newley, A; Minchin, T; Sherman & Sherman - Harper, P

    9-minute dazzling Roald Dahl medley.Chitty Chitty Bang Bang;Pure Imagination;When I Grow Up2nd section +Duration 9 minsListen to Cory BandCourtesy of World of Brass

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, PhilipCode:

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilisations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.Duration: 18:00

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days