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  • £34.95

    When Thunder Calls - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    When Thunder Calls was commissioned by Dr Nicholas Childs and the Black Dyke Band for their performance at the Gala Concert of the Swiss Open Championships in September 2011. When composing this piece, I decided to focus on both the music and the stage presentation. The way the piece has been composed and designed makes it a very effective way of starting a concert or a second half of a concert.At the start of the piece, the percussion enter the stage and take their positions in their usual place behind the band. They begin playing the piece without a conductor. They keep repeating the opening section while the Basses, Horns, Baritones and Euphoniums march onto the stage.This group of musicians take their seats with the Horns, Baritones and Euphoniums sitting where they usually sit in the band but the Basses sit where the solo cornets usually sit, forming an inner semi-circle of lower brass. When seated and when the music gets to the end of bar 4 the piece continues onto section A. All performers keep repeating this next 4-bar phrase until the trombones march onto stage and stand at the front of the stage with the Bass Trombone standing in between the other two trombones.All performers then play from figure B to C with the trombones taking the lead at the front. When the performers get to rehearsal figure C they repeat this section (the same as section A) while the trombones move from the front of the stage and take their positions where the Basses would normally sit (between the horns and the percussion) and remain standing. Meanwhile, the flugel enters the stage and stands at the front of the stage (standing where the trombones did). When in position the flugel soloist picks up into rehearsal figure D.When the flugel soloist finishes playing, just before rehearsal figure F they then move to their normal seat in the band. At figure F the cornets march onto the stage from either side, they turn and stand side by side each other facing outward towards the audience forming two ‘fanfare’ lines either side of the lower brass. The conductor follows the cornets on stage and on cue they lift their instruments at the same time and perform when the piece gets to figure G.There is no more moving around from this point on other than the solo cornet to move forward with the solo euphonium and perform their duet at letter H. Also the horns are required to stand and play at letter I and then sit just before J.When performed with all the choreography, this piece makes for an exciting addition to any concert repertoire both for the performer and the audience.Suitable for 3rd Section Bands and Above

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £87.00

    High Flyers - Andrew R. Mackereth

    From the composer: High Flyers are regarded as people with promise and potential.They are winners. This is music for winners.The title, as well as being a play-on-words, implies the nature of the work. It is a bright, optimistic, and upbeat piece attempting to depict an exhilarating ride on flying carpet. The opening rising chords immediately suggest the gentle elevation of the carpets' ascent towards unknown heights, leading to a hint of a first theme in the horns at Fig. B. The first four notes provide the thematic material for the whole work: C F G A.A perpetual sense of movement is achieved through accented quaver chords punctuating the melodic material of the first main theme. Fig. E sees the music of the opening bars fully realised, with flourishes from the euphonium and baritones representing swirling clouds, shooting stars, or passing birds in flight.The same subject is developed into a lyrical second theme with a new lush harmonic treatment, evocative of gliding over an expanse of sparse countryside.This section ends with a note of serenity but is shattered by the urgent insistence of the percussion rhythms.The third section introduces a new idea with a slightly distorted fanfare in the cornets and trombones. This figure suggests for the first time that there may be trouble ahead. In fact, there is no need to fear and the journey can continue without aggravation. This fanfare returns near the end to signal a final note of triumph.A new rhythmic variant of the cell motif emerges as the third theme now transformed by the addition of a triplet figure. The music steadily gains momentum before moving inexorably towards the climactic return of the music and tonality of the opening bars of the piece.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £49.95

    Blaze - Phil Lawrence

    Cornet/trumpet sounds have been changing for some years; they are becoming heavier, more robust, slower vibratos. The dynamic level now pushed out by your average solo cornet is 30% more than it was some 35/40 years ago. This, is mainly due to the bore size of instruments and mouthpiece sizes (as in bigger), and, demands of modern day works for band on the player/soloist, and of course a greater demand of styles on the player, and progressive teaching methods. The technical styles in Blaze are about these changes.In Blaze I have clearly blended symphonic blowing styles of the trumpet plus the virtuosic attributes of today's modern cornet player. Many solo cornets parts (more past than present) in band are often clearly defined between low A and top C above the stave. Orchestral trumpet players need a working range of another fourth at either end of this defined range; I have incorporated this range into the concerto. The low register is much explored, and the average tessitura throughout is constantly varied below and above the stave from pedal Eb to super F# opt. The ideology of this blend of course makes sense as the original dedication is to Rod Franks, LSO, and of course blending with that is Rod's history at Black Dyke Mills Band.The concerto is ten minutes long and in one movement comprising of four sections and one solo cadenza, with one section only appearing once, an episode. This singular section was a revised addition and dedicated to Richard Marshall who gave the first premier in New Zealand in June 2003. For the purists the form is thus, A, B, A (vari), C (episode). D (slow movement), E (3/8 episode 1), D (vari), E, (episode 2). A (last move), B, A (developed) = (coda finale).The compositional style? Well, I hope quintessentially, 21st C English with an element of nostalgia (modal/old English). There are some hints at jazz playing styles and rhumba, but romantic English I would say, and especially the slow movement.Blaze is also very bold; the title itself reflects this, full of bravura and constant amazement, offering little respite for the soloist and sapping much stamina. The opening statement from the soloist is without accompaniment; just as a matador stands alone in the ring for the first few seconds, and looks at the mass crowd in defiance, he thinks, "you are here to see me die", so the soloist stares the audience back in the face, and opens with the richest, largest sound (not loudest) one can muster, thus throwing the gauntlet down to the ears of all who might disbelieve what they are about to encounter, a gladiatorial cornet, a Blaze from the stage.For the soloist, it is a non-stop Blaze of sound, electrifying technique, sage-like musicianship, super-human stamina and sheer matador-like bravura with 10th Dan mastery of over-all control, a test beyond the reasonable. And for the audience? Of course, a BLAZE never to be forgotten. Phil LawrenceThis work can be heard performed by cornet soloist Richard Marshall & the Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their award winning album entitled 'BLAZE'

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    The Pilgrim's Prayer (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Rouse, Sydney - Ball, Eric

    Introduction - This could hardly be more simple. Inexperienced players may have some little difficulty in intonation, especially as they are starting 'cold', but a useful lesson can be learned in this connection when rehearsing these two bars. Section A - The music is hymn tune-like in character, but it should not become stilted. Close intonation is still a point to study, especially in view of the chromatic nature of some of the harmony. Section B - Aim to secure just balance in the accompanying parts, especially in the second phrase, where the 1st comets may be inclined to treat their moving part as an independent melody rather than part of the 'colour' background. Section C -This is a reprise of the first theme, with a different arrangement. The same comments apply, however. Section D - Here the music becomes more song-like in style, and provides an interesting contrast. The scoring, too, is more varied, and there are a number of points that call for attention. Note that the 1st and 2nd comets and 2nd trombone work as a team throughout; see that the pulsating, syncopated background adds to the movement of the music without giving a jerky effect; the new entries in the fourth and twelfth bars are to be made quite smoothly; and do not allow the texture of the music, especially in the last eight bars of the section, to overshadow the simplicity of the main tune. Section E - Here the first subject appears again. In the arrangement the colour contrasts are quite clear-cut. In order to secure true balance in the fifth and sixth bars, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of tone given by the bass trombone, as this part is not doubled as are the other parts. Section F -This section forms a simple but expressive coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.50

    The Pilgrim's Prayer (Brass Band - Score only) - Rouse, Sydney - Ball, Eric

    Introduction - This could hardly be more simple. Inexperienced players may have some little difficulty in intonation, especially as they are starting 'cold', but a useful lesson can be learned in this connection when rehearsing these two bars. Section A - The music is hymn tune-like in character, but it should not become stilted. Close intonation is still a point to study, especially in view of the chromatic nature of some of the harmony. Section B - Aim to secure just balance in the accompanying parts, especially in the second phrase, where the 1st comets may be inclined to treat their moving part as an independent melody rather than part of the 'colour' background. Section C -This is a reprise of the first theme, with a different arrangement. The same comments apply, however. Section D - Here the music becomes more song-like in style, and provides an interesting contrast. The scoring, too, is more varied, and there are a number of points that call for attention. Note that the 1st and 2nd comets and 2nd trombone work as a team throughout; see that the pulsating, syncopated background adds to the movement of the music without giving a jerky effect; the new entries in the fourth and twelfth bars are to be made quite smoothly; and do not allow the texture of the music, especially in the last eight bars of the section, to overshadow the simplicity of the main tune. Section E - Here the first subject appears again. In the arrangement the colour contrasts are quite clear-cut. In order to secure true balance in the fifth and sixth bars, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of tone given by the bass trombone, as this part is not doubled as are the other parts. Section F -This section forms a simple but expressive coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days