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    Supernova - Andrew Stevenson

    A supernova is a stellar explosion that emits as much energy as the sun will emit in its lifespan. Supernovae are extremely luminous and cause a burst of radiation that often briefly outshines an entire galaxy, before fading from view over several weeks or months. The music in Supernova portrays the life of the phenomena. It starts with an explosion of sound from the percussion and the excitement builds into letter A, where the real energy is unleashed. Separate layers create the idea of energetic chaos as the explosion and energy expand. The music slows down towards the middle, showing the decay of the supernova, and moves into another quick section that symbolises the creation of another explosion. Three broad melodies then take the piece to its final conclusion.

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    Echoes - Andrew Stevenson

    Echoes is an original light concert item based on the style of an Irish Air. The core of the piece is a melody which is first heard in the euphonium and then moves onto cornet and then later becomes a tutti passage. As well as this melody, there are also moments in the piece where some motifs are heard in counterpoint; this is where the title Echoes comes from. These counterpoint ideas symbolise the motivic sounds bouncing around a chasm and echoing back.The music gives lots of chances for bands to show off their sound as well as the principle players in their solos. There is also a wide scope of opportunities for conductors to insert their own musicality into the music to bring out emotion and drama. Echoes is a very simple and effective piece, it is also extremely catchy and easy to listen to.

  • £55.00 £55.00
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    Myth of the Mountain - Andrew Stevenson

    In Greek mythology Mount Olympus was regarded as the "home" of the Twelve Olympian gods of the ancient Greek world. The music depicts three of the most famous gods and goddesses, their traits and what they symbolise. The piece is split into 4 seperate movements:I. Prelude.II. Apollo: The god of music, healing plagues and prophesieIII. Aphrodite: The Goddess of love and beautyIV. Zeus: The king of the Gods, ruler of Mount Olympus and god of the sky, weather, thunder, law, order, and fate'Myth of the Mountain' can be used as a 2nd/3rd Section test piece, but could be used as a substantial work for concerts.

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    5th Ave - Andrew Stevenson

    5th Ave. is a light concert item that fuses together elements of jazz, rock, pop and funk. The basis of the piece is a simple strophic structure of verses, choruses and a middle 8; which is typical of most rock and pop songs. The heavy use of stab chords and syncopation in the piece are a common feature of funk and big band music. There are lots of opportunities in 5th Ave. for the principal players to shine with the many solo's and with the option for them to stand at the front it can make it a very entertaining piece to watch as well as listen to.

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    Equinox (Trombone Solo) - Andrew Stevenson

    Equinox was written for Ryan Watkins, the principal trombone of the Brighouse and Rastrick Band. The piece starts with a lullaby, led by the melody of the trombone. However, it is not always a gentle scene; towards the middle of the piece the music creates a haunting atmosphere before building to a triumphant climax. The music then settles back down into a peaceful setting. The use of tuned percussion creates a dreamy feel to the music. In essence Equinox depicts the balance between dreams and reality while you drift to sleep, the different emotions of the dreams themselves and the peaceful, undisturbed sleep in between.

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    Brass Quintet No. 1 - Andrew Stevenson

    Brass Quintet No. 1 was written for the Ewald Brass Quintet, a group of first year musicians from the Royal Northern College of Music. The piece is in three movements in the typical fast-slow-fast structure. The first movement is the hardest of the 3, the quick tempo and multiple time changes make the music tricky but very exciting. The second movement is a slow melodic movement, packed with emotion and opportunities for ensembles to add their own musicality to it.The third movement goes through many different styles and gives every player a chance to show their technical abilities and melodic playing.

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    Lament - to the Unknown - Andrew Stevenson

    Lament ? to the Unknown was written in the memory of Rob Southwick, who passed away in Easter 2012. Rob was a talented musician who worked with many local music and drama groups around Doncaster; this piece pays homage to the immense musicianship and talent of Rob.The piece itself is very simple, both rhythmically and technically. The tempo is slow and calm, representing a reflective hymn. The basis of the piece is built on dissonant chords and atmospheric percussion which creates a wonderful soundscape of colour. The falling fourths of the distant trumpet calls emulate feelings of sadness and mourning and the somewhat disjointed melodies give the piece a mysterious sound. The piece grows to an emotional climax before settling down for a chilling end.

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    Fanfare for the Future - Andrew Stevenson

    Fanfare for the Future was commissioned by the organisers of the annual Madhurst Brass Festival 2012 to open the final concert. The title pays homage to the James Watson Memorial Fund, the choice charity of the event, which gives opportunities to young brass players. The piece opens with an epic fanfare featuring the cornets and trombones and the remaining instruments join gradually. The music then shifts gear into an exciting, fast tempo. This section features different time signatures, tricky technical passages and some of the initial motifs from the start return. The music then slows down for a melodic euphonium solo followed by a cornet solo which gradually builds to an emotional climax. The music gains tempo for a final sprint to the end, where the music finishes with a climax of rich chords and fanfares.

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    Quintessence (Brass Quintet) - Andrew Stevenson

    Quintessence was originally written for the Quintessence Recorder Quintet in 2012, but was rescored for brass quintet shortly after. The piece is in 5 small, continuous movements:The first movement is a flowing opening with each instrument joining one at a time. The basis of the first movement is made up of mini motifs that feature elsewhere in the piece too. The second movement is a lilting fugue in a baroque style. The main melody gets transferred from player to player throughout the movement, and should be the main focal point whenever it occurs.The third movement is a gentle hymn-like passage, with the horn carrying most of the melody through the movement. The movement builds to a climatic key change before calming down once more to a soft close.The fourth movement is based on another motivic statement. This light hearted movement is tricky in places but should always feel energetic and delicate.The fifth movement is a combination of ideas from the previous movements all culminating into an exciting finale.

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    Worlds Apart (Cornet Solo) - Andrew Stevenson

    Worlds Apart is a lyrical solo for cornet and piano. The basis of the piece is the use of two contrasting themes, in the form of melodies. These themes symbolise longing and hope. The opening melody is longing and the next melody at letter B is one of hope. The idea behind the piece is that the two themes show the connection of longing or loneliness and hope when faced with being apart from something/someone special. The emotional build-up of the piece should enable performers to bring this idea to life, with extra thought taken on expression and phrasing to show the contrasts.