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  • £29.95

    Dalaro (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The name of Edward Gregson is well known in Salvationist circles as well as in the wider music world, his music receiving performances and being recorded and published regularly. This music is individual and of high worth with an assured technique. It is always a pleasurable task for the musician to handle music with these qualities, whether one is editor, conductor or player. Written in connection with the International Salvation Army Students' Fellowship Conference held in Dalaro, Sweden in 1964, this is a 'festival' rather than processional march. Section C is a tune from the Swedish Tune Book (No. 303 in the 1945 edition), Jag gar till det land dar ovan (I go to that Land above). There is a slight divergence from the tune book version (labelled, by the way, as an English tune); this could well be the manner in which the tune is sung - we are all aware of the way in which congregations modify tunes.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days
  • £14.95

    Dalaro (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The name of Edward Gregson is well known in Salvationist circles as well as in the wider music world, his music receiving performances and being recorded and published regularly. This music is individual and of high worth with an assured technique. It is always a pleasurable task for the musician to handle music with these qualities, whether one is editor, conductor or player. Written in connection with the International Salvation Army Students' Fellowship Conference held in Dalaro, Sweden in 1964, this is a 'festival' rather than processional march. Section C is a tune from the Swedish Tune Book (No. 303 in the 1945 edition), Jag gar till det land dar ovan (I go to that Land above). There is a slight divergence from the tune book version (labelled, by the way, as an English tune); this could well be the manner in which the tune is sung - we are all aware of the way in which congregations modify tunes.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days
  • £91.10

    Circius - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    The work is important for me because it was my first piece to be performed outside Norway. Black Dyke Band/David King performed it and did a recording of it in 1991. In the original score I quote a Swedish bishop (Olaus Mangnus) who lived in the 15th century. He travelled around Scandinavia and drew maps - very important historic material. When he came to the north of Norway (where I come from) he decribed the wind from the north as Ciricus: (something like) Worst of all winds is Circius, that revolves (?= turn upside down) heaven and earth. (Well, not a good translation Im afraid). The fast sections reflects the mighty winds from the north. In the middle section, I borrowed afolksong-like tune (by C. Elling, a Norwegian composer). The text (by Kristoffer Janson) tells about old times when the fishermen used open boats: they had to put their lives in the hands of God.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £84.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.Click here for the piano reduction

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days
  • £39.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
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    Elizabethan Serenade - Ronald Binge - Len Jenkins

    Elizabethan Serenade was composed in 1951 by Ronald (Ronnie) Binge. When Walter Eastman at publishers Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew (who had given Ronnie much encouragement following his return to the music industry after the war) heard the piece he said it sounded like an Elizabethan serenade and with the accession of Queen Elizabeth II in February 1952 and the advent of a second 'Elizabethan age' the piece was re-titled to that with which we are now familiar. The tune was used as the theme for the popular 1950s radio series Music Tapestry, Music in Miniature on the BBC and as the play-out for the British Forces Network radio station. It won an Ivor Novello award in 1957 and had chart successes in Germany and South Africa. Lyrics by poet Christopher Hassall were added later, along with those in German, Czech, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, Danish and French. There was even a reggae version. In 2012, the year of the Queen's Jubilee, one website put it: "The song of the dayis Ronald Binge's Elizabethan Serenade" and, accordingly, it was played at the official Jubilee concert and The Last Night of the Proms.