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  • £47.00
  • £30.00

    1941 March - John Williams

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £40.00 £40.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS (print)

    FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS Portraits of English composer in his time, with full Thematic Catalog of Works (1900 - 1941), compiled and edited by Paul Hindmarsh Revised edition published in 2016 by PHM Publishing ? 2016 by Paul Hindmarsh 272pp, A4, Print version (? 40.00) available by pre-paid order via www.paulhindmarsh.com PHMB001print FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS is a major revision and update of my life and work of this English composer originally published by Faber Music in 1983. Frank Bridge - A Thematic Catalog charted the composer's intriguing creative journey from 1900, the year of his first surviving compositions were 61 in 1941. Much has changed with regard to Bridge research since 1983. His life and work has been the subject of many post-graduate research projects. All his major works have been recorded and are more widely performed. Bridge's music has been in the public domain since 2011. April 13, 2016, when the manuscript of Phantasie in F minor for string quartet (H.55) was discovered in the archive of theWorshipful Company of Musicians. After half a lifetime of writing about Bridge's life and work for journals, program previews and registration notes, I have a lot of writing and an extensive selection of correspondence by Bridge and his friends and some significant 'period' articles and images to create, I hope, a more complete picture of Frank Bridge inthe context of his time. I have also included full details of commercial recordings or each work (up to January 2016) within the chronological sequence. Paul Hindmarsh, April 2016 Contents Time line PART 1 Bridge in his time 1 Biographical sketch - Seeds of Discontent Paul Hindmarsh 2 The Good Old Days Ivor James (1941) 3 Memories of a unique friendship Daphne Oliver (1979) 4 Modern British Composers I: Frank Bridge Edwin Evans (1919) 5 An Interview with Frank Bridge P.J. Nolan (1923) 6 Frank Bridge Herbert Howells (1941) PART 2 The Complete Works 1 Introduction 2 Sources 3 Thematic Catalog of Works 1900-41 4 Classifieds Index of Works 5 Bibliography Jessica Chan and Paul Hindmarsh Index of titles and first lines General index

  • £37.50 £37.50
    Buy from AFS Music

    At Last - Harry Warren & Mack Gordon - Steve Yorke

    First released in 1941, this song is as popular today as it ever was. This arrangement goes back to it's roots, in the style of Glenn Miller.

  • £9.99

    John Williams: Epic Themes (Score) (Brass Band/Score) - John Williams

    is amedley of John Williams favourites including Star Wars (Main Theme), March (1941), Imperial March (from Star Wars Episode V : The Empire Strikes Back), Olympic Spirit and Superman (Main Theme), arranged with the approval of the composer by Steve Sykes.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £44.60

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war.Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert.On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good.If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £44.00

    December 7th - Hans Zimmer - Klaas van der Woude

    The commemoration of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour on 7th December 1941 was portrayed in the unique film Pearl Harbour, staring Tom Cruse. The music was composed by the prize winning composer Hans Zimmer. The piece December 7th is a dramatic work which accompanies the high point of the film and Klaus van der Woude's arrangement looses none of the excitement of the original.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept-Brown-Tobias - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war. Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert. On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good. If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £35.00 £35.00
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    Lament by Frank Bridge (arr. for brass band by Paul Hindmarsh)

    English composer Frank Bridge (1879 – 1941) composed Lament on 14 June 1915, in memory of Catherine Crompton, who drowned when the Cunard liner Lusitania was torpedoed by a German submarine on 7 May, 1915 off the coast of Ireland. 1201 men, women and children lost their lives out of the 1962 people aboard. Ninety-four children died, including Catherine, her twin brother Paul and four other siblings. Paul Crompton, Snr. (44), a British businessman working in Philadelphia, his wife Gladys (40) and the family nanny were also drowned. How Bridge’s dedication came about is uncertain. One contemporary source says that Bridge knew the family, but it is also possible that he came across the family photograph which was published in many newspapers in the wake of the sinking. His response to this personal tragedy was characteristically spontaneous and utterly sincere. It is one of his most effective miniatures, poignant yet restrained in its lyrical beauty, with compelling directness and simplicity.This arrangement was made for performance at the 2015 RNCM Festival of Brass where it was beautifully performed by Cory Band under Philip Harper.Duration: 4-5 mins Score and parts ?35, plus postage and packing Score: ?10PHM Catalogue No. PHM010

  • £65.00 £65.00
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    A Wartime Sketchbook by William Walton, arr. Paul Hindmarsh

    During World War II, William Walton, one of the most eminent of British composers, provided music for several films deemed to be of 'national importance'. Scoring Lawrence Olivier's Shakespeare epic Henry V in 1943 was the most substantial of these wartime projects. His role in patriotic films from 1941 and 42 like The Foreman Went to France, Next of Kin, Went the day Well? and The First of the Few was to provide appropriate title music and some underscoring at key moments. Walton extracted the most substantial portions of the latter as the popular Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra. The remaining music remained unpublished until 1990, when Christopher Palmer assembled the highlights from the soundtracks into A Wartime Sketchbook, ssix numbers of which were arranged into a colourful suite for Besses o' th' Barn and Black Dyke Mills bands in the 1990s. 1. Prologue: This is the stirring title music from Went the day Well?, a screen play by Graham Greene about a German airborne invasion of an English village. The main theme leads to (2) Bicycle Chase, characteristic musical high-jinks for J.B.Priestley's The Foreman went to France. (3) Refugees, from the same film, is a poignant accompaniment to the long march of refugees, while (4) Young Siegfrieds is a lively movement comes from the music that Walton composed for The Battle of Britain in 1968, but which the film's producer rejected. It portrays first the Berliners, cheerfully ignoring the black-out and then, in the trio, the Young Siegfrieds of the Luftwaffe, courtesy of a parody of Siegfried's horn call from Wagner's opera. In (5) Romance from Next of Kin, a soldier and a Dutch refugee snatch a few tender moments together. (6) Epilogue: at the end of The Foreman went to France, the French look forward with hope and optimism to eventual liberation. Romance (3') and Young Siegrfireds (4') can be performed separately. Duration: 14 mins Published by arrangement with the copyright holders, Oxford University Press. ?65, plus postage and packingPHM Catalogue No. PHM008