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  • £27.50

    Eighteenth (18th) Variation, The - Rachmaninov, S.

    A melancholy Rachmaninov melody (from the Paganini Variations for Piano & Orchestra) to melt any romantic's soul. Anyone who doesn't find this melody gorgeous in the extreme needs prolonged medical treatment !

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £34.95

    Walking With Heroes - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The idea behind the title is that as humans we remember great people living and past who have touched our lives and have made a big impact on how we lead our lives; people like our loved ones, family members, friends, religious leaders and celebrities. They have either taught us, helped us to understand or lead their lives by example and, in our eyes, are heroes. We look up to these people and remember them as heroes. Their spirit and influence stays with us wherever we are. Thus, we are 'Walking with Heroes'.This piece was commissioned by Donald Hanson in memory of his father, William. It was first performed by Black Dyke Band on Saturday 18th May 2007 in Bridgewater Hall, Manchester. Walking With Heroes is the title track of Paul Lovatt-Cooper's debut CD, recorded by the Black Dyke Band.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    Bugeilio'r Gwenith Gwyn (Watching the Wheat) - Welsh Traditional

    Bugeilio'r Gwenith Gwyn is an 18th century Welsh love song known to many by its English title of 'Watching the Wheat'. Although the song describes a tragic love affair, the music remains extremely popular with musicians throughout Wales.This skilful new setting for euphonium and brass band by Welshman Gareth Wood was commissioned by Robert and Lorraine Childs and given to their son David as a 26th birthday present.Bugeilio'r Gwenith Gwyn can be heard on the CD Celtic Charm (DOYCD214) on which the performers are David Childs and the Cory Band.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £49.99 £49.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    The Sorcerer's Apprentice | Dukas arr. Alwyn Green

    Most of us are familiar with the symphonic poem written by 19th century composer, Paul Dukas, which was inspired by an 18th century poem by Goethe in which the sorcerer's apprentice, desiring to save himself some work attempts to try his hand at his masters craft when things go terribly wrong!This version, arranged by Alwyn Green for Brass Band, captures the spirit of the original masterpiece in a complex and challenging score for Brass Band. It has all the drama, and vibrant energy of the Dukas masterpiece, brilliantly orchestrated for Brass Band.Listen to the piece played by Foresters Brass 2000, from their CD : 'Heritage' which can be obtained from the band.

  • £20.00

    Scarborough Fair

    Scarborough Fair is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.As the versions of the ballad known under the title Scarborough Fair are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the theory that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task.As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc.The earliest notable recording of it was by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, a version which heavily influenced Simon and Garfunkel's later more famous version. Amongst many other recordings, the tune was used by the Stone Roses as the basis of their song "Elizabeth my Dear". To view a sample PDF score click here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

     PDF View Music

  • £67.00

    Ungarsk marsj - Hector Berlioz - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    The "Rakoczi March" (Hungarian March) was the unofficial state anthem of Hungary before Ferenc Kolcsey wrote the Himnusz which is today the official national anthem of Hungary.The first version of this march-song was probably created around 1730 by one or more anonymous composers, although tradition says that it was the favorite march of Francis Rakoczi II. That early version called back Francis Rakoczi II to save his people. It was very popular in the 18th century but in the 19th century the more refined Rakoczi March became prevalent.Hector Berlioz included the music in his composition "La Damnation de Faust" in 1846, and Franz Liszt wrote a number of arrangements, including his Hungarian Rhapsody No. 15, based on the theme. The march gave its name to a 1933 Austrian-Hungarian feature film - Rakoczy-Marsch This arrangement is based on Berlioz instrumentation and phrasing from his Hungarian March, but in the form of the 19th century Rakoczi March

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days