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  • £15.00

    Senza Mamma - Giacomo Puccini - Phillip Littlemore

    The aria Senza Mamma (Without your mother), sung in the opera by Sister Angelica, is one of the most poignant moments in any of Puccini's works, and has remained a repertoire favourite. Suor Angelica is the second instalment in Puccini's triptych of one-act operas commonly known as Il trittico. The opera chronicles the fall, redemption, and final transfiguration of its central character, Sister Angelica, who has taken the veil in repentance for bearing a child out of wedlock. The libretto, by Giovacchino Forzano, was immediately appealing to the composer, whose sister Igenia was Mother Superior of the convent at Vicepelago. Though it contains some of Puccini's most adventurous writing (the musical language at times even flirts with polytonality) the work has not enjoyed popularity comparable to that of its companions, Il Tabarro and Gianni Schicchi , each of which has enjoyed an independent life in the repertory. Item Code: TPBB-015 Duration: c.3'40"

  • £20.00

    Slavonic Dance No.8 - Antonin Dvorak - Phillip Littlemore

    Antonin Dvorak composed his first set of eight Slavonic Dances in 1878. Originally written for piano duet, the dances were inspired by Johannes Brahms’ Hungarian Dances , and were orchestrated soon after composition at his publisher’s request. The music is lively and overtly nationalistic, although the tunes themselves are all original and are not taken from any Slavic folk dances. It was indeed this first set of Slavonic Dances that finally launched Dvorak as a composer beyond his native Bohemia. Such were the popularity of the original dances, Dvorak wrote a second set of eight in 1886. Slavonic Dance No.8 is high-spirited and in the style of a furiant, the boldest of Czech folk dances. Although written in a 3/4 metre throughout, Dvorak creates cross-rhythms that shift this metre in to 2/4, which is an important characteristic of the furiant. Item Code: TPBB-036 Duration: 4'10"

  • £25.00

    Sweeney Todd Suite - Phillip Littlemore

    For almost two centuries, the enduring legend of the maniacal barber of Fleet Street, Sweeney Todd, and his savoury human pies has inspired terror in the hearts and minds of the public, whether through the printed page or the theatrical stage. Malcolm Arnold's ballet, Sweeney Todd , was first staged in 1959 by the The Royal Ballet Company and choreography by John Cranko. The music was later adapted as a concert work and it is from this version that this brass band arrangement is made. The original concert suite lasts some 20 minutes, but this version has been shortened to a more manageable eight minutes. An optional cut is also marked reducing the piece to six minutes, making it ideal for brass band concerts. Item Code: 0-571-56918-8 Duration: 8'00" (6'00" with cut)

  • £25.00

    Symphonic Dance No.3

    Completed in 1940, the set of? Symphonic Dances was Sergei Rachmaninov's last composition. The work is fully representative of the composer’s late style with its curious, shifting harmonies, the almost Prokofiev-like grotesquerie of the outer movements and the focus on individual instrumental tone colours throughout.? Rachmaninov composed the Symphonic Dances four years after his Third Symphony, mostly at the Honeyman Estate, ‘Orchard Point’, in Centerport, New York, overlooking Long Island Sound. The three-movement work’s original name was Fantastic Dances, with movement titles of ‘Noon’, ‘Twilight’ and ‘Midnight’. When the composer wrote to the conductor Eugene Ormandy in late August, he said that the piece was finished and needed only to be orchestrated, but the manuscript for the full score actually bears completion dates of September and October 1940. It was premiered by Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra, to whom it is dedicated, on 3rd January, 1941. This arrangement is of the last dance and is a kind of struggle between the Dies Irae theme, representing Death, and a quotation from Rachmaninov’s own Vespers (also known as the All-night Vigil, 1915), representing Resurrection. The Resurrection theme proves victorious in the end as the composer actually wrote the word ‘Hallelujah’ at the relevant place the score (one bar after Fig. 16 in this arrangement).? This arrangement can be seen being played by East London Brass, conducted by Jayne Murrill,? here .? Item Code: TPBB-040 Duration: 3'45"

  • £25.00

    The Great Gate of Kiev - Phillip Littlemore

    Modest Mussorgsky was a close friend of the young artist and architect Victor Hartmann, and his death in 1873 plunged Mossorgsky into a deep depression. The following year a memorial exhibition in St. Petersburg displayed Hartmann’s paintings, costumes, architectural designs and sketches. Mussorgsky’s visit to it, combined with his desire to write a piece in his friend’s memory, inspired him to compose his Pictures At An Exhibition for piano. A suite of ten movements, with a recurring Promenade theme, it is one of the composer’s most famous works and regarded as a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It is perhaps the orchestral transcription made by Maurice Ravel in 1922 that is now the most famous version of it. This arrangement opens with a brief excerpt from The Hut on Fowl’s Legs , which was based on a painting of an elaborately carved clock depicting Baba Yaga, a horrible tiny witch that feasts on human bones. The tenth, and final picture in Mussorgsky’s masterpiece is commonly referred to as The Great Gate of Kiev , although it’s literal translation is The Bogatyr Gates — a Bogatyr being a hero figure in medieval East Slavic legend. It features a grand main theme that is interspersed with a more solemn hymn-like secondary theme. The work closes with a grand final rendition of the Promenade theme that almost grinds to a halt at what must be the foot of what were to be magnificent ceremonial gates (although they were never actually built!). Item Code: TPBB-045 Duration: c. 6'00"

  • £30.00

    The Magic Flute Overture - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Phillip Littlemore

    Mozart’s The Magic Flute is a two–act opera composed in 1791, the year of his death. It was the culmination of a period of increasing involvement by Mozart with Emmanuel Schikaneder's theatrical troupe, which since 1789 had been the resident company at the Theater auf der Wieden. The Magic Flute is noted for its prominent Masonic elements; both Schikaneder and Mozart were believed to be Masons and also lodge brothers. Much of Mozart’s Masonic music is written in the key of E flat. This key, with 3 flats is indicative of Masonic symbolism. There are other examples of the number three in the opera as well. The opening chords of the introduction sound three times, which also happens during the Temple scenes. Also represented in threes are the three temples of Wisdom, Reason and Nature. Tamino tries to open the three doors of the temple. There are three ladies, the attendants to the Queen of the Night, and three boys who serve as guides to Tamino and Papageno. Mozart evidently wrote the music while keeping in mind the skills of the singers intended for the premiere, which included both virtuosi and ordinary comic actors, asked to sing for the occasion. Thus, the vocal lines for Papageno and Monostatos are often stated first in the strings so the singer can find their pitch, and are frequently doubled by instruments. In contrast, Mozart's sister-in-law Josepha Hofer, who premiered the role of the Queen of the Night, needed no such help — indeed this role is famous for both its technical difficulty and range. Item Code: TPBB-008 Duration: c.6'30"

  • £35.00

    The Sorcerer's Apprentice - Phillip Littlemore

    French composer Paul Dukas wrote his symphonic poem, The Sorcerer's Apprentice , between 1896 and 1897. Subtitled ‘Scherzo after a ballad by Goethe’, the piece was inspired by Goethe's 1797 poem of the same name. By far the most performed and recorded of Dukas' works, perhaps it’s most notable appearance was in the Walt Disney animated film Fantasia? from 1940, which led to the piece becoming widely known to audiences outside the classical concert hall. The original orchestral work is some 10 minutes in length, however this brass band transcription has been abridged to create a more manageable 6-minute work, yet retains the urgency, magic and colour of the original.? Item Code: TPBB-030 Duration: 6'00"

  • £20.00

    The Stars and Stripes Forever - Phillip Littlemore

    The patriotic American march ?The Stars and Stripes Forever is the official National March of the United States of America, as decreed by a?1987 act of the U.S. Congress. It is probably Sousa's most famous composition. While on vacation in Europe with his wife, Sousa received word that his good friend and band manager, David Blakely, had died. Sousa quickly returned to the States aboard the S.S. Teutonic, and whilst aboard he began to form the music that was to become his most famous march. According to his Sousa's autobiography, Marching On , he composed the majority of the work on Christmas Day 1896: "I did not transfer a note of that music to paper while I was on the steamer, but when we reached shore, I set down the measures that my brain had been playing for me, and not a note of it has ever changed."? For twenty-five years Sousa's Band played the march at almost every concert it held. TPBB-064 Duration: 3'50"

  • £30.00

    The T.V. Detectives - Phillip Littlemore

    The TV Detectives brings together five of Nigel Hess’s best-known television themes (Dangerfield, Campion, Wycliffe, Maigret and Hetty Wainthropp Investigates), all originally written for small-screen sleuths in whodunnits that have been enjoyed by TV audiences worldwide. Dangerfield, a BBC series about a Warwickshire police surgeon, originally starred Nigel le Vaillant, before Nigel Havers took over the lead role. Campion, also from the BBC, was based on Margery Allingham’s stories of a mild-mannered 1920s gentleman detective, played by Peter Davison. HTV's Wycliffe, the long-running series set in Cornwall starring Jack Shepherd as a somewhat dour and low-key DCI - but, of course, he always solved the case! Michael Gambon starred in Granada TV’s latest incarnation of the famous French detective Maigret, while Patricia Routledge played the OAP sleuth to perfection in Hetty Wainthropp Investigates, another popular BBC series. Item Code: 0-571-56423-2 Duration: 8'40" ?