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  • £95.00 £95.00
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    KirkFeld

    Grant Kirkhope Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From “GoldenEye” to “Banjo-Kazooie”, “Viva Pi?ata” to “Donkey Kong”, “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” to “Civilization: Beyond Earth” and “Perfect Dark” to “Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse”. He has also recently scored the feature film “The King’s Daughter” starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on “Yooka Laylee” and “Dropzone”. Grant’s score for “Viva Pi?ata” was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. “Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian’s Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian’s 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion “now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it’s good, how about writing a piece for me ?” I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian’s playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I’d write. I said since I live in LA I’d like to write a “Hollywood” trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that’s what I’d like to write - well I’d certainly like to try” – Grant Kirkhope

  • £24.95

    Silent Night - Franz Gruber

    In 1816, a Roman Catholic priest called Josef Mohr composed a short six-stanza poem for his Christmas service which he entitled Stille Nacht. On Christmas Eve in 1818 the church organ at St Nicholas Church, Oberndorf had broken down and he happened to show his organist and choirmaster Franz Gruber the poem he had written, wondering if it could be set to music which would not require the organ.Gruber spent that afternoon composing, what would become the most loved Christmas carol of all time. It was first performed that very Christmas Eve, with the church choir and Gruber accompanying them on guitar.Although Gruber's original melody has altered little since 1818, it was originally performed as a sprightly 6/8 dance. Over the years the melody has been slowed down and we now recognise it most commonly as a gentle, meditative lullaby.The song's lyrics have been translated into around 140 different languages and it has been used extensively, in countless guises all over the world.Perhaps its most poignant use however was during the First World War Christmas Truce in 1914, where it was sung simultaneously by French, English and German troops stationed on the front line, being the only carol they all new.This new arrangement for brass band yet again breathes new life into this timeless classic. Lush harmonies and its reflective texture will make this a welcome addition to any festive program.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £21.50

    Once Upon A Christmas Song - Peter Kay & Gary Barlow - Gavin Somerset

    They just don’t write Christmas songs like they used to! Enter, Geraldine McQueen (AKA Peter Kay) who set to put all that right with her (his!) spoof Christmas song, ‘Once Upon A Christmas Song’, co-written by Gary Barlow. The proceeds from the single were donated to the NSPCC and at its peak, reached number 5 in the UK charts. The song’s memorable video and hook which tells of them singing Christmas songs ‘Over & Over & Over again’ made the melody an instant hit. Now your band can inject some humour into your festive concerts with this great little number. Is there a hidden Geraldine in your band?!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £87.00

    Theme Park Fun! - Wilco Moerman

    In Theme Park Fun! your orchestra pays a visit to an amusement park. During your visit, you will experience some spectacular rides and attractions this theme park offers. The uniqueness of Theme Park Fun! is the interplay between music and (moving) images. Animations and illustrations support the visual composition (downloadable after ordering a set, on www.gobelinmusic.com).Part 1: The Entrance & Parade [with animation]The opening of the park is a fact. A day full of fun and pleasure awaits! You and the other visitors will be confronted with all the rides, attractions and adventures the theme park has to offer. Which ride shall we do first?! There is so much to do and experience on this day in the park! A parade of colorful floats and park figures is passing by.Let the fun begin!Part 2: The Haunted House [with animation]The only ride in the park that is not related to fun, is the Haunted House. Here visitors will be challenged to visit a house full of ghosts, creepy figures and other ominous things. The clock strikes twelve, there is no turning back. Ghosts are whispering, yelling, screaming... Fortunately it is almost one oclock, so we can leave this creepy place quickly.Part 3: The Swinging Galleon [with illustrations]What a huge pirate ship! Each time you swing back and forth, you will feel that weird feeling in your stomach. When you are thrown completely into the top you will have a fantastic view over the park, but you can not enjoy it for long. Before you know the ship swings back the other way.Part 4: The Fairy Tale Ride [with illustrations]After all those exciting and spectacular rides and attractions, it is time for a peaceful tour in The Fairy Tale Ride. Surrounded by a fairytale setting, you will discover fable figures, talking animals and colorful designs. Such a beauty and tranquility. Having had this experience, we are ready again for the big rides in the park!Part 5: The Bumper Cars [with illustrations]Now its time to crawl behind the wheel of the Bumper Cars! Shall we all chase the conductor?! Before you know you are hit by another visitor or you will bump against someone else. In this tough ride you can prove yourself as a real driver, or perhaps as a really bad one.Part 6: The Roller Coaster [with illustrations]The largest, fastest and scariest ride in the park ... we should definitely do the Roller Coaster! All together in the train, the over-the-shoulder restraints are lowering... be ready to ride. The train leaves the station and is heading for the big lift hill. It will be very scary when the train reaches the top and the train will be plunged down the first drop! Loops, corkscrews and other spectacular coaster elements will follow... Before you know it, the ride of your life is over. Shall we ride it again?!Part 7: Leaving the Park [with animation]Unfortunately everything comes to an end. This day in the theme park is over, but we have a lot new experiences to talk about! The memories of all the funny and spectacular rides will come up when we walk through the park to the exit. Just one look over the shoulder, the amusement park figures are waving at us. Hopefully we will come back again soon!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £79.95

    Waiting for a Pain Hit!??!!? - Paul McGhee

    Waiting For a Pain Hit!??!!? was written during November and December 2006 as an entry in the 2006/07 Swiss Brass Band Association Composers Competition. It was later chosen as the Championship Section set test piece for the 2010 Swiss National Brass Band Championships.The piece originates from sketches for a Brass Quintet which was written whilst I was in my second year of studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. The piece, now being much more elaborate both musically and structurally than the original, aims to explore the many various textures available to a large brass ensemble. The aims of the piece, from its earliest stages, were mainly exploration of textures as well as dealing with issues of continuity and whilst the piece certainly contains challenging technical elements, they were not a driving force behind its inception and more organically grew from the primary aims of the piece. I was purposefully looking throughout the writing and editing process to create a piece of music with a seamless, ethereal quality to both the structure and the musical content.There are no 'performance directions' throughout the piece, the reasoning for this is explained below. However, I have spent much time and thought over the tempo markings throughout the piece and the tempos throughout the piece are the desired tempi and care should be taken with these. The tempo markings contained throughout the piece form a vital part of the structure and affect the continuity of the piece. Metronome marks contained within a box show the tempo of the new section in relation to the tempo that precedes it by use of metronome modulations. Any alterations tothe tempo of the section that precedes it will alter the boxed metronome marks.The title of a piece of music, please forgive my generalisation, is to give an insight into 'what a piece is about'. I suppose that this piece is no different, but with the title being slightly abstract I shall resist the temptation to reveal what it means to me. The title, I feel, needs to be open to interpretation along with the music within. That's the way, with this piece especially, I like my music to be. Freedom to find our own meaning and a way to express it from within the score is vital. It is only then that the piece can take on its own identity and grow in ways that even I might not have imagined, revealing different sides to its personality with each performance.Before the music begins I have included some text. Do these words hold the key to the music?! Can they help??!I DON'T KNOW!!!I just like the rhythms, the pulse and the imagery. Hopefully all of this can help to create a picture. But let it be your picture...Paul McGhee, June 2010.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £10.00

    Ave Maria

    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750) was a German composer and musician of the Baroque period. Bach's compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Goldberg Variations, the Mass in B minor, two Passions, and over three hundred cantatas of which approximately two hundred survive. His music is revered for its technical command, artistic beauty, and intellectual depth. Bach's abilities as an organist were highly respected during his lifetime, although he was not widely recognised as a great composer until a revival of interest in and performances of his music in the first half of the 19th century. He is now generally regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time.Charles-Francois Gounod (1818 - 1893) was a French composer, best known for his Grand Operas, most famously 'Faust', written in 1859 and his 'St Cecilia Mass' written in 1854. However possibly his most performed work is his arrangement of the latin text Ave Maria based on a work by Bach.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £24.95

    The Civil Defenders - Sir Patrick Moore

    The Civil Defence Association of Great Britain was formed as a support body for the Civil Defence Service and, while the Service had its own march, the Association did not - until recently. Sir Patrick Moore CBE FRS, astronomer, television personality extraordinaire, retired xylophonist, pianist and composer, was approached in the hope that he might provide a suitable march for the Civil Defence Association. Although now musically inactive through illness, he produced from his vast collection of marches written over a long period, the present one which he entitled, The Civil Defenders. Although originally scored for piano, Sir Patrick enlisted the help of his old friend and musical collaborator, Rodney Newton, who has arranged versions for brass and wind bands. The style of Civil Defenders is that of a traditional British 'road march' and embodies all the panache and gusto which that implies.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £69.95

    STARMAKER (Brass Band Set) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    Described by the composer as one of his more ambitious works for brass band, this work is in three movements. Although each movement is capable of standing alone, the composer's own concept is totality with the three movements forming a composite whole. Starmaker presents in music the concept of God's creation of the universe. The frantic and sometimes harsh music of the first movement portrays the chaos from which the immortal and invisible wisdom of God created the order and structure of the heavens, with the stars and planets in their ordered places. An exquisite second movement, based on the benediction 'Now the day is over', brings a calm and ordered peace to the universe, also reminding listeners of the night sky, when God's amazing work is best viewed in all its awesome wonder. The final movement is celebratory in nature, with fragments of melodies like 'Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation' appearing in various guises.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days