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  • £34.95

    HAPPY DAY, A (Cornet Solo with Brass Band Set) - Erik Leidzen

    This composition was awarded first prize in the Theme and Variations Section of the 1926 Salvation Army Band Music Competition and has remained popular with cornet soloists and audiences ever since. This was the first in a trilogy of cornet solos with the word 'day' in the title written by Erik Leidzen, the others being 'Happy all the Day' and 'Wondrous Day'.

  • £59.95

    MY STRENGTH, MY TOWER Rhapsodic Variations (Brass Band Set) - Dean Goffin

    This music consists of a theme followed by five extensive variations. The theme is the composer's own tune set to the words, 'Thee will I love, my strength, my tower', a hymn by Johann Scheffler translated by John Wesley. A strong modal flavour is characteristic of the theme. Variation 1: This is a light and graceful variation with a good deal of imitative writing. It leads, without a break, into the next variation. Variation 2: Fire and ferocity are asked for in the course of this variation. Variation 3: This variation demonstrates the original approach of the composer. Solo lines for cornet and euphonium are included with their arabesques and arpeggii. Variation 4: Taking the form of a passacaglia, the 'ground' is given out at once by the basses. Fragments of the 'ground', plain or decorated, are combined and used in a number of ways, revealing the composer's mastery of counterpoint. Variation 5: The briskly moving and scintillating final variation abounds in sudden variations of dynamic. The tempo remains constant until an increase is called for in the coda. This 'contest' version has been prepared by Brian Bowen who was asked to re-work the percussion part and introduce a repiano cornet part (Salvation Army band publications do not, in general, have a part for repiano cornet).

  • £34.95

    SOUTHERN CROSS, The (Brass Band Set) - Brian Bowen

    The Southern Cross is one of several excellent marches by Brian Bowen in which he carried on the more sophisticated pattern of British marches by Wilfred Heaton, Leslie Condon and Ray Steadman-Allen. It was written for the Box Hill (Australia) Corps jubilee celebrations in 1970 and formed part of the band's repertoire when it toured Great Britain in the same year. The first half of the march features part of the song, 'March on!' by Klaus Ostby, an early pioneer of Salvation Army music in Scandinavia. The contrapuntal layering of melodies in the trio, especially in the finale where 'March on!' sounds one more triumphant time, is notable, as is the shift to a slower, more stately tempo. The harmonic and rhythmic style also represents the more modern sounds of Salvation Army brass band music in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Right from the opening gestures, listeners at early performances knew that a page had turned in the evolution of the Salvation Army march.

  • £29.95

    ARMY OF GOD (Brass Band Set) - Emil Soderstrom

    This march was awarded first prize in the 1930 American Golden Jubilee National Music Competition and was published the same year in the first edition of the American Festival Series. It was subsequently re-printed in the General Series of 1984. Soderstrom's imaginative use of syncopation and chromatic harmony brought a new, American sound to the Salvation Army march. For example, he took the old Salvation Army fight song Hark, hark my soul written and changes its metre from 6/8 to 4/4 while also syncopating it!

  • £29.95

    ANTHEM OF THE FREE (Brass Band Set) - Dean Goffin

    Prior to becoming a Salvation Army officer, Dean Goffin was the first Salvationist composer to gain a degree in music composition. This march was originally written for the 4th Brigade Band of the New Zealand Armed Forces (which Goffin conducted during World War Two) and called Bel Hamid before being adapted for Salvation Army use. The march contains the gospel song Ring the bells of heaven (...pealing forth the anthem of the free).

  • £29.95

    SPIRIT OF JOY (Brass Band Set) - Herbert Rive

    Herbert Rive contributed just two compositions to Salvation Army music, the other being the festival march The King's Command. Spirit of Joy was awarded first prize in the 1953 70th Anniversary March Competition in New Zealand. Rive uses a short syncopated motif based on the first few notes of the Salvation Army tune If you keep singing to tie all aspects of this march together.

  • £29.95

    SILVER STAR (Brass Band Set) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The title of this march, published in 1962, refers to the pin originally given to the mothers, but now also the fathers, of cadets entering The Salvation Army's Schools for Officer Training. It includes the song, 'Mothers of the Silver Star' (words by Arch. R Wiggins, music by George Marshall) which was specially written for the first occasion at which Silver Stars were presented. Also included is a Salvation Army flag song, 'Yellow star, and red and blue' also written by the aforementioned Wiggins and Marshall.

  • £44.95

    TRAILBLAZERS (Brass Band Set) - Andrew Mackereth

    This overture draws its inspiration from the story of the first Household Troops Band. It tells the story of the 1887 band, the subsequent lull of nearly a hundred years and the re-awakening of the Troops phenomenon in 1985. It was originally written in 1995 and featured prominently by the band on its North American tour of 2002. Given the history of the Household Troops Band, it is fitting that this composition is preoccupied with marching. It begins with a marching song played by a solitary muted cornet, symbolic not only of the call to bandsmen to join the evangelical effort but also a muso-dramatic device to indicate the steady increase in members and technical ability! The music quickly develops into stirring versions of 'A robe of white' and 'Storm the forts of darkness' with two early day Salvation Army tunes crucially adding to the narrative; 'Marching on in the light of God' and 'Soldiers of our God, arise!' The second section is a reflective setting of the Herbert Booth song, 'The penitent's plea'. This song serves to represent the many people who were 'saved' during those early day campaigns. The expressive music transports the listener through a period of uncertainty and angst until finally reaching the song, 'There is a message, a simple message, and it's a message for us all'. The final section deals first with the emergence from the annals of history with the muted cornet figure again before, symbolically, the present day band bursts forth with an emphatic statement of 'Would you be free from your burden of sin? There's power in the blood'. The stirring climax represents a fitting tribute to those gallant pioneering musicians and their equally impressive and dedicated contemporaries.

  • £44.95

    PRAISE TO THE LORD (Brass Band Set) - Andrew Mackereth

    Written for the 2003 tour of Canada and USA by Bristol Easton Band of The Salvation Army, this set of variations provides the whole band with a stern examination of technical and musical aptitude, whilst engaging the listener from beginning to end. The commission given to the composer was to create a set of variations with a similar framework to that of Edward Gregson's 'Variations on Laudate Dominum'. As in the famous Gregson work, the theme (Lobe den Herren) is not heard in its entirety until the final section when the majestic tune provides a fitting and stirring conclusion to the music.

  • £69.95

    TRANSFORMATION (Brass Band Set) - Kenneth Downie

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.